United States Department of Defense United States Department of Defense

News

American Forces Press ServiceBookmark and Share

 News Article

Naval Crowd Grills Cohen on Pay, Housing, Healthcare

By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service

MANAMA, Bahrain, April 6, 2000 – “It’s a lot better for me to have you close, because I take advantage of every chance I have to look into the faces of the people who are serving us.”

That’s how Defense Secretary William S. Cohen began a talk April 6 with 1,500 sailors, Marines and DoD civilians in the naval support activity gymnasium here. He called them to step closer, and soon he was surrounded by a sea of desert camouflage.

Cohen spoke and answered questions about military pay, recruiting and retention, the housing allowance, health care and anthrax. He is on a trip through the gulf states that will end April 12.

He thanked the service members and civilians for their service. “All of you over here making the daily sacrifice is something we are immensely proud of,” he said. “I came to meet you and thank you and tell you that you are always on my mind, especially whenever I sign deployment orders.”

The first question Cohen received was on future pay raises. He said that following the record pay increase in fiscal 2000, the pay raise for the next few years is 3.9 percent. “Congress can change this, as they did last year,” he said.

Pay is an important part of keeping good people in the military, he said, especially since military people possess many of the traits private industry wants. “We’ve got the challenge of how do we attract the quality of people you represent into the military and then, once you are there, hold on to you,” he said.

“So private industry wants you, but I have the job of saying ‘but don’t go yet,’” he said. “We’ve got to remain competitive [with private industry]. We can’t match the private sector, but we can do better.”

One way is through reform of the basic allowance for housing. Cohen said service members living off-base in the United States pay an average of 19 percent of their housing costs out of pocket. “That’s simply unfair,” he said. “We’re putting $3 billion in the budget to go from that 19 percent down to zero in the next four-and-a-half years.”

The change would result in money back in service members' pockets.

Cohen called military health care the most important remaining issue he must deal with. “You cannot do your jobs if you are worried about whether or not your families are going to be taken care of,” he said. “The TRICARE system hasn’t worked as effectively as it was originally conceived. We are going to make a number of changes in how it operates.”

These changes include eliminating co-pays for TRICARE Prime and TRICARE Remote. Cohen also hopes to change the way the program is administered and seeks to use technology to help doctors, nurses and other medical professionals do their jobs more efficiently.

He assured the service members that he would deal with the issue of medical care for retirees. “We cannot make a promise to you as far as saying we will take care of you for life and then not deliver,” he said. “I am working with [Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army] Gen. [Henry] Shelton to come up with a proposal to deal effectively with that issue.”

He said DoD is working on keeping the force strong for the future. He said modernization accounts have finally hit $60 billion in the fiscal 2001 budget request. Over the next five years, the modernization account will go up to $70 billion.

“We are finally starting to recapitalize our force,” he said. “We’ve been living off the build-up from the early 1980s, and we went through the peace dividend. Now we have to start rebuilding the military to make sure we buy the equipment we need to remain the best-equipped force in the world.”

Cohen answered a question about the anthrax inoculation program by giving a short history of it. He said following the Gulf War the regional commanders in chief said they had a real problem with the growing threat of chemical and biological weaponry.

“The commanders in chief recommended that we protect you against the possibility that Saddam Hussein might launch a Scud loaded with an anthrax warhead,” he said.

Cohen insisted on independent research, testing and safeguards and then launched the program.

“The notion that somehow [the anthrax program] should be voluntary -- that each one of you should decide whether you should get an anthrax shot -- is absurd,” he said. “Would it be voluntary to wear a flak jacket, or a helmet, or carry a weapon?”

The vaccination program is essential for force protection, he said.

“I know my decision was controversial in some of the reserve units and Guard units,” he continued. “But it seems to me it is my responsibility to protect you if I have on hand the ability to do that. I have no real option.”

Following the questions and answer period Cohen walked into the crowd and spoke with the sailors and Marines. He ended the visit by shooting baskets with Lt. j.g. Jason Panik, an intelligence officer with a P-3 Orion squadron. Cohen, who played hoops at Bowdoin College in Maine, had some trouble finding his range, but when he did, it was nothing but net.

Contact Author

Related Sites:
DoD News Briefing: Press Conference with Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen in Amman, Jordan
·DoD News Briefing: Press Conference with Secretary Cohen at Ittihadiyya Palace, Cairo, Egypt
DoD News Briefing: Press conference with Secretary Cohen and Prime Minister Barak in Jerusalem
·DoD News Briefing: Secretary Cohen's Media Interview by Traveling Press en route to Israel
DoD News Briefing: Secretary Cohen's Media Interview by Traveling Press en route to Nigeria
DoD News Briefing: Press Conference with Secretary Cohen and Ambassador Twaddell in Nigeria
DoD Background Briefing: Secretary's Trip to Africa and the Middle East

Related Articles:
Optempo, Housing, TRICARE Top Stennis Sailors' Concerns
Central Command, Qatar Negotiating on Base
Cohen Moves to Gulf, Discusses Iran, Iraq in Qatar
Mideast Military Exercises a Priority, Cohen Says
Cohen and Egyptians Talk Missile Sale, Regional Defense
Cohen, Barak Reaffirm U.S.-Israeli Bonds, Discuss Contentions
U.S., Nigeria Discuss Defense Cooperation
Cohen Pledges $10 Million to Build Nigerian Democracy
Countering Coups: The Military Serves the People
Africa, Mideast Trip to Focus on Cooperation


Click photo for screen-resolution imageDefense Secretary William S. Cohen re-enlists three Seabees during a troop talk at the Naval Support Activity in Manama, Bahrain, April 6. Photo by Jim Garamone.   
Download screen-resolution   
Download high-resolution


Click photo for screen-resolution imageDefense Secretary William S. Cohen speaks to sailors and Marines at the Naval Support Activity in Manama, Bahrain. He answered questions about pay, anthrax, housing and health care during his April 6 visit. Photo by Jim Garamone.  
Download screen-resolution   
Download high-resolution


Click photo for screen-resolution imageDefense Secretary William S. Cohen speaks with sailors following a troop talk at the Naval Support Activity in Manama, Bahrain, April 6. Photo by Jim Garamone.  
Download screen-resolution   
Download high-resolution



Top Features

spacer

DEFENSE IMAGERY

spacer
spacer

Additional Links

Stay Connected