United States Department of Defense United States Department of Defense

News

American Forces Press ServiceBookmark and Share

 News Article

Gates, Mullen Reaffirm Commitment to Afghanistan, Pakistan

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Aug. 1, 2010 – Conditions on the ground in Afghanistan will determine when, and to what degree, U.S. forces in that country will draw down, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said today. Video

Gates and Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, appeared on television talk shows today. They explained President Barack Obama’s Afghanistan strategy and the “July 2011” timeline.

“We are not leaving Afghanistan in July 2011,” Gates said on ABC’s This Week. Rather, that’s when U.S. forces hope to begin a “transition process and a thinning of our ranks.”

Obama announced his Afghanistan policy in December. Since then, the Taliban has been working to strike fear into Afghans, saying that American forces will not be around after summer 2011. However, Gates said that having announced a timeline is not working against the U.S. efforts.

“The pace will depend on the conditions on the ground,” Gates said. “The president has been very clear about that. And if the Taliban are waiting for the 19th month, I welcome that, because we will be there in the 19th month, and we will be there with a lot of troops.”

The U.S. forces in Afghanistan are working to reverse gains made by the Tailban and other militant groups, Gates said, explaining the troops’ goal is defeating al-Qaida, not nation building.

By denying the Taliban and al-Qaida control of the country, and by improving Afghan security forces, U.S. forces will prevent Afghanistan from becoming another staging ground for attacks on the United States, Gates said.

“We are not there to take on a nationwide reconstruction or construction projects in Afghanistan,” he said. “We are in Afghanistan because we were attacked from Afghanistan, not because we want to try and build a better society in Afghanistan.

“But doing things to improve governance, to improve development in Afghanistan, to the degree it contributes to our security mission and to the effectiveness of the Afghan government in the security arena, that's what we're going to do,” he added.

The way out of Afghanistan is through the Taliban reconciling on the Afghan government’s terms, Gates said. But the Taliban will not lay down their arms and detach from al-Qaida without security and governance in place, he added.

“I think those are the conditions … reconciliation must be the end game here,” he said. “But it must take place on the terms of the Afghan government.”

Despite July being the deadliest month for U.S. troops in the entire 9-year war in Afghanistan, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs said U.S. forces remain steadfast.

The U.S. must continue to focus on the Afghan people, and must show both, Afghans and Pakistanis that the U.S. is committed to their security, Mullen said.

“We left Afghanistan in the late ’80s, [and] we left Pakistan in the late ’80s,” Mullen said on CBS’s Face the Nation. “And we find ourselves back there now. Certainly the questions that are out there from the citizens … is, ‘Are they going to stay this time?’”

Mullen called the mission in Afghanistan a regional effort. The U.S. will be there for the long term, he said.

“I believe we’ve got to stay,” the admiral said. “We’ve got the right strategy, we’ve got the right resources.

“Sadly and tragically, we predicted this would be a very difficult year, but we’ve got the right strategy and leadership, and this, over the course of the next year or so, is really a critical time,” Mullen said.

Contact Author

Biographies:
Robert M. Gates
Navy Adm. Mike Mullen


Comments

Article is closed to new comments.

The opinions expressed in the following comments do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Defense.

8/2/2010 12:52:51 AM
let me guess, the strategy used will be. setting up traps to kill Taliban. traps on roads for IED planters & turning a Taliban ambush on your troops, into a ambush on them, buy flying drones over troops heads as they go out on walks. i would then say making full proof id cards is a big part of the strategy. you need a id card, if you get killed, that will be 1 less Taliban with a id card in the area. so no more endless supply of Taliban men. every day every night 24/7. show us you id cards. area by area. so area by area killing off Taliban men that got id cards made up, by setting up traps. well plus my other 100 strategy's that YOU WILL USE. you could not even come up with 4 strategy's. wow, i did Iraq and Afghanistan strategy's. WOW good luck with your next war :) well at least you mite win Afghanistan. if they change strategy in 1 or 2 years, you will need more crushing strategy's. good luck
- scott ryan, Adelaide

Top Features

spacer

DEFENSE IMAGERY

spacer
spacer