Army Researchers Improve Soldiers' Lives

Department of Defense Photo Essay

  • The U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine is housed on a leafy, waterside post at the Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Mass., alongside a handful of other military research and development agencies. As the Defense Department’s lead research lab for operational medicine it studies the physiological effects that rations, clothes and gear have on soldiers.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Holly McClung, a research dietician at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., explains the latest nutrition research that is influencing the content of meals ready to eat, better known as MREs, and new “First Strike” rations, May 6, 2009. For example, First Strike rations now contain caffeine gum and nutritional supplements that can help soldiers in the field make better decisions during operational stress. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • A thermal mannikin is used to test the thermal and vapor-resistance values of one of the Army’s proposed new chemical suits at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., May 6, 2009. The institute uses two of the life-sized mannikin, capable of mimicking walking and sweating. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Tom Endrusick, Research Physical Scientist, wipes the sweat from one of two life-sized mannikins, capable of mimicking walking and sweating, at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass. The mannikins are used to test the thermal and vapor-resistance values of uniforms.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Spc. Mark Kryskow, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., runs on a treadmill in one of the Doriot Climatic Chambers May 6, 2009. The two chambers can simulate environmental conditions ranging from the arctic to the tropics. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Spc. Mark Kryskow, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., runs on a treadmill inone of the Doriot Climatic Chambers May 6, 2009. The two chambers can blast wind up to 40 miles-per-hour and rain up to four inches an hour.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Joshua Bulotsky, a climatic chambers engineer, talks to Army Spc. Mark Kryskow, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., as he runs on a treadmill in the Doriot Climatic Chambers May 6, 2009.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Dr. Edward Zambraski, chief of the military performance division at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., talks about research conducted on exoskeletal systems in the institute’s biomechanics lab, May 6, 2009.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Sgt. Michael Cavallo, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., walks on a patented, force-sensing treadmill invented by lab personnel, May 6, 2009. Infrared cameras and sensors capture soldiers’ movements while marching and the treadmill measures the force placed on their bodies while shouldering a load. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Sgt. Michael Cavallo, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., walks on a patented, force-sensing treadmill invented at the lab, May 6, 2009. Dr. Joseph Seay monitors Cavallo’s efforts. Systems are attached to measure oxygen consumption to determine locomotion efficiency.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Sgt. Michael Cavallo, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., walks May 6, 2009, on a patented, force-sensing treadmill invented by those at the lab. Infrared cameras and sensors captures soldiers’ movements while marching and the treadmill measures the force placed on their bodies while shouldering a load.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Sgt. Michael Cavallo, a research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., is fitted May 6, 2009, with sensors that will be detected by infrared cameras as he walks on a patented, force-sensing treadmill invented by those at the lab. The sensors capture his movements and translate it to data and the treadmill measures the force placed on his body while shouldering a load.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Much of the work by scientists and soldiers at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., is published in the form of Army doctrine or in medical manuals, May 6, 2009. These layout the guidelines commanders use for training and combat operations. They address water requirements, the weights of loads carried by soldiers, heat, cold and altitude, and health and performance issues as well as nutritional requirements.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Pvt. Phillip Faulkner, a soldier research volunteer, walks May 6, 2009, on a treadmill as part of a study by the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass. The lab is studying the use of natural supplements to improve physical performance. Much of the institute’s research is conducted using data collected from soldiers recruited to take part in the studies.
 DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Pvt. Phillip Faulkner, a soldier research volunteer, walks on a treadmill as part of a study by the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., May 6, 2009. The lab is studying the use of natural supplements to improve physical performance. Much of the institute’s research is conducted using data collected from soldiers recruited to take part in the studies. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III Caption Required.
  • A lab technician tests hormone samples in the central analytical lab at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., May 6, 2009.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Pfc. James Akers, a medical lab technician, tests hormone samples in the central analytical lab at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., May 6, 2009.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Sgt. Brooke Green demonstrates the weapons simulator at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., May 5, 2009. The simulator can mimic the ballistic characteristics of 25 different weapons and is used, among other research tools, to test warfighter responses to sustained operations and fatigue. It also is used to test marksmanship training methods. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Pvt. Phillip Faulkner, a research volunteer, takes off his body armor May 6, 2009, after walking on a treadmill as part of a study by the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass. Much of the institute’s research is conducted using data collected from soldiers recruited to take part in the studies.  DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III
  • Army Sgt. Sarah Elliott, a biological research assistant at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass., talks about one of the institute’s two altitude chambers. The chambers can simulate altitudes of up to nearly 30,000 feet and temperatures to 25 degrees below zero. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III