U.S. Marines Train Mongolian Soldiers in Nonlethal Weapons

Department of Defense Photo Essay

  • U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ryan Trunk discusses the proper use and general specifications of the X26 taser during nonlethal weapons training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013. Members of Mongolia's armed forces and police received an in-depth class on the X26 taser before using and feeling the effects of the nonlethal weapon firsthand. U.S. Marines assigned to the 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force, hosted the exercise. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Ryan Trunk demonstrates proper stance, grip and aiming technique for the X26 taser during nonlethal weapons training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013.  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • Mongolian troops pass around a used cartridge for the X26 taser during nonlethal weapons training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • A U.S. Marine nonlethal weapons instructor demonstrates how to properly grip the X26 taser during training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013.  U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • A Mongolian policeman operates the X26 taser during nonlethal weapons training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013. U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • Mongolian troops demonstrate how the electrical circuit for the X26 taser can be completed when two individuals are linked and one prong goes into each person during training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013.  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • A Mongolian service member reacts to being stunned by the X26 taser during nonlethal weapons training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013.  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • Mongolian service members receive a brief "drive stun" during nonlethal weapons training at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013.  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle
  • U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Alexander Orellana, left, explains the importance of prong separation for the X26 taser to Mongolian Col. B. Baatar at Five Hills Training Area, Mongolia, Aug. 22, 2013. When used on a subject, the taser's prongs should be at least four inches apart for maximum effectiveness of the weapon. Orellana, a chief nonlethal weapons  instructor, is assigned to the 3rd Law Enforcement, 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force. U.S. Marine Corp photo by Sgt. Ben Eberle