U.S. and Australian Soldiers Conduct Controlled Burn, Bagram Air Field

Department of Defense Photo Essay

  • Australian Army Maj. David Bergman, left, and U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jason Blunck, right, stand on barriers at the edge of an area of overgrown vegetation on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008, prior to initiating a controlled burn of the area. The field must be burned to clear it for de-mining operations and to prevent flooding by Coyote Creek, which runs through Bagram Air Field and surrounding villages. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jason Blunck tosses the first incendiary grenade into a field to start a controlled burn on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • U.S. Army Spc. Caleb Carlen takes note of the time and logs the information on a map as an incendiary grenade is thrown into a field during a controlled burn on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • Australian Army Sgt. Lisa Tucker throws an incendiary grenade into a as part of a controlled burn on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 21, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jason Blunck, far right right, and Spc. Quincy Lendo, center, observe a controlled burn of a field on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • U.S. Army Spc. Quincy Lendo moves a ladder along the barrier to be used by members of the team for better viewing during a controlled burn on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • U.S. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Brian Lee and Australian Army Maj. David Bergman, standing on the ladder, watch the progress of a controlled burn on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • A field of overgrown vegetation is set fire during a controlled burn on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 20, 2008. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class C. Joel Peavy
  • Australian Army Maj. David Bergman and Sgt. 1st Class Jayson Blunck,  stand with village elders over a tunnel that allows Coyote Creek to run under the flight line at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 25, 2008. U.S. and Australian soldiers had conducted a controlled burn in the creek area five days earlier to allow for de-mining of the section and to get ready for a silt-removal operation to restore water flow. The silt build up had been causing flooding in some villages, while preventing other villages from having water.  U.S. Army photo by Spc. Mary L. Gonzalez
  • Australian Army Maj. David Bergman and Sgt. 1st Class Jayson Blunck, stand with village elders over a tunnel that allows Coyote Creek to run under the flight line at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, Oct. 25, 2008. The soldiers explained how a controlled burn revealed silt build-up and what coalition forces would do to correct water flow problems.  U.S. Army photo by Spc. Mary L. Gonzalez
  • Australian Army Maj. David Bergman and a resident from a local village trace the path of Coyote Creek, which runs through Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan Oct. 25, 2008, and nearby villages. Bergman explains how silt build up, and not coalition forces' actions, had disrupted the creek's flow, causing some villages to have no water and others to have flooding. Coaliton forces plan to clear the silt to restore proper water flow. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Mary L. Gonzalez