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IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release No: 0090-08
February 04, 2008

Fiscal Year 2009 Department Of Defense Budget Released

President George W. Bush today sent to Congress his Defense budget for Fiscal Year 2009. The budget provides $515.4 billion in discretionary authority for the Department of Defense (DoD), a $35.9 billion or 7.5 percent increase over the enacted level for Fiscal Year 2008. 
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget reflects the President’s priorities and sustains his commitment to prevail in the Global War on Terror; increase ground combat capabilities; improve force readiness; develop the combat capabilities needed to meet future threats; and improve the quality of life for Service members and their families.
 
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said, “the President’s budget for FY 2009 provides the resources necessary to maintain an agile, highly trained, and lethal fighting force, increase Army and Marine Corps end strength, and sustain the United States’ technological advantage over current and potential enemies.” Specifically, the Department’s request:
 
  •        Maintains a highly trained fighting force of 2.2 million soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines;
  •          Recruits, trains and equips 65,000 additional active duty soldiers and 27,000 additional Marines over five years;
  •          Provides pay increases of 3.4 percent for military members, improves benefits for the all-volunteer force, and increases pay 2.9 percent for the civilian workforce;
  •          Provides world-class health care for 9.2 million eligible Service members, families, and retirees;
  •          Procures and maintains an arsenal of the world’s most advanced weapon systems;
  •          Improves warfighting capabilities and invests in science and technology to maintain U.S. advantage over the Nation’s enemies;
  •          Maintains 545,000 facilities at 5,300 sites in the U.S. and around the globe; and
  •          Maintains vital intelligence capabilities.
Key highlights are outlined in the attached document. The Fiscal Year 2009 budget is posted at www.budget.mil .
 
 
 
PRESIDENT BUSH’S FISCAL YEAR 2009 DEFENSE BUDGET SUBMISSION
President Bush’s Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $515.4 billion in discretionary budget authority for the Department of Defense, a $35.9 billion or 7.5 percent increase over the enacted level for Fiscal Year 2008.
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 Defense budget request sustains the President’s commitment to growing U.S. ground forces that are needed to prevail in the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, to sustain a high rate of military readiness and prepare for a wide range of threats that face the Nation now and in the years ahead, and to care for Service members and their families. This year’s request increases investments in five areas: prevailing in the Global War on Terror (GWOT); increasing ground combat capabilities; improving force readiness; developing future combat capabilities; and improving quality of life for Service members and families.
 
Prevailing in the Global War on Terror
 
The global threat posed by violent extremists is the preeminent danger of our time. To ensure freedom and security and advance peace and stability throughout the world, the United States must succeed in Iraq and Afghanistan and work with its allies and partners to prevail in the ongoing struggle. 
 
In addition to the $515.4 billion request, the Administration requests $70 billion as an emergency allowance for the Global War on Terror. Details will be provided to Congress once the specific requirements of our troops on the ground are better known.
 
In Fiscal Year 2008, Congress appropriated $86.8 billion or 46 percent of the President’s $189.3 billion request for GWOT.   Congress has not yet appropriated the remaining balance – $102.5 billion – of funds requested and needed for U.S. forces currently in combat. 
 
These additional funds are required to pay our military personnel, continue operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, reconstitute our forces, provide force protection for the troops, and fund the Iraqi and Afghan security forces. 
 
Build Partnership Capacity
 
Recognizing that threats to U.S. security exist beyond the war on terror in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. must also build and strengthen the military and security capabilities of our global partners to increase the effectiveness of U.S. forces.
 
 To strengthen the military and security capabilities of global partners, the Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $750 million: 
·         $500 million for the Global Train and Equip Program,
·         $200 million for security and stabilization assistance, and
·         $50 million for the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund for Urgent Humanitarian Relief and Reconstruction.
 
 Africa Command
  
To strengthen U.S. security and promote peace and stability in Africa, DoD requests $389 million in Fiscal Year 2009 to establish the U.S. Africa Command. The new geographical command will focus primarily on building partnership capacities, conducting theater security cooperation, building important counter-terrorism skills and, as appropriate, supporting other U.S. Government agencies in implementing programs that promote regional stability.
 
Increase Ground Combat Capability
 
The Nation’s security demands a ready and available warfighting force. To that end, the U.S. is increasing its ground forces to meet current and projected needs and to sustain a high state of military readiness and support. The growth in ground combat forces will increase the potential for longer time at home station between deployments for soldiers and Marines.
 
Increase Ground Forces
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $20.5 billion, an increase of $8.7 billion or 73 percent over the Fiscal Year 2008 enacted level of $11.9 billion, to increase the size of the Army and Marine Corps to meet operational demands and to increase the average time that soldiers and Marines are home between deployments.
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $15.5 billion to increase Army active end strength to 532,400, which includes an increase of 7,000 over the Fiscal Year 2008 request. The Army plans to increase active end strength by a total of 65,000 to 547,400. In Fiscal Year 2009, the number of active Army Brigade Combat Teams (BCT) will increase by two BCTs, from 40 to 42, toward a goal of 48 BCTs.
Similarly, increasing the number of Marines in the operating forces is expected to reduce stress on the force. The Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $5.0 billion, an increase of $.9 billion over the Fiscal Year 2008 enacted level, to increase Marine Corps end strength to 194,000, which includes an increase of 5,000 Marines over the Fiscal Year 2008 request. To achieve three balanced Marine Expeditionary Force units, and to increase time at home station between deployments, the Marine Corps plans to increase end strength by a total of 27,000 to 202,000 by Fiscal Year 2011.
 
Improve Force Readiness
 
Sustaining critical combat and support operations, the Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $158.3 billion, an increase of $14.9 billion or 10.4 percent over the Fiscal Year 2008 enacted level of $143.4 billion, to maintain DoD operations at levels consistent with those of Fiscal Year2008. To maintain combat readiness, the Fiscal Year 2009 budget requests $68.0 billion to keep our force of soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines at the highest levels of proficiency. The budget invests in readiness measured in terms of tank miles driven per month, ship steaming days underway per quarter, and flying hours per month. Also included is $33.1 billion for logistical, intelligence, and Service-wide support activities.
 
The budget also requests $10.7 billion for training, recruiting, and retention to attract and retain Service members possessing critical skills needed to meet tomorrow’s defense requirements; $11.8 billion for equipment maintenance and to increase repair and refurbishment of equipment, and the transition of systems from development to fielded systems; and $32.6 billion for facility and base support.
 
 
Develop Future Combat Capabilities
               
In addition to strengthening the combat readiness of America’s armed forces, the Nation continues to invest in the strategic modernization necessary to meet current and future threats from land, sea, air, or space. The United States must also maintain its significant advantages in warfighting capabilities and work to prevent adversaries from acquiring or using weapons of mass destruction. 
 
Continue Modernization
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget requests $183.8 billion in modernization to meet future threats, an $8.3 billion increase or 4.7 percent over the Fiscal Year 2008 enacted level of $175.5 billion. This includes procurement, as well as research and development.
               
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $9.2 billion, an increase of $0.4 billion, to maintain and strengthen joint ground capabilities and to continue development of the Army’s Future Combat System -- including manned and unmanned vehicles, the non-line-of-sight launch system, and the joint network communications system -- system upgrades to the Stryker weapons system, and chemical weapons destruction.  
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget requests $16.9 billion to strengthen joint maritime capabilities including: the CVN-21 Carrier; one DDG-1000, the next generation surface combatant; two littoral combat ships; two joint high speed vessels; two auxiliary cargo ships (T-AKEs); and one Virginia Class submarine.
 
Joint Air Capabilities are strengthened in the Fiscal Year 2009 budget that provides $45.6 billion, a $4.9 billion increase over Fiscal Year 2008 enacted levels, for F/A 18 Hornet and E/A-18G Growler fighters, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, V-22 vertical lift aircraft, additional unmanned aerial vehicles, and the recapitalization of various missiles and other weapons.
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $10.7 billion, an increase of $1.6 billion, to strengthen joint space-based capabilities in several categories, including Space-Based Infrared Systems, communications satellites, Global Positioning System satellites, environmental satellites, Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellites, and launch vehicles. 
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget also provides $79.5 billion for an array of modern command, control, communications, computers and intelligence ($16.4 billion); procurement of advanced munitions and missiles ($11.0 billion); and mission support ($52.1 billion) such as ammunition, portable generators, cooling equipment, field medical supplies, hospital equipment, and night vision goggles.
 
Sustain Research and Development
 
 Changes in the 21st century threat environment create strategic challenges from irregular warfare, potential adversaries having weapons of mass destruction, and disruptive technologies. The Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $11.5 billion to sustain ongoing science and technology efforts, including $1.7 billion for basic research, an increase of $300 million over the Fiscal Year 2008 budget request.
 
Improve Missile Defense Capabilities
 
To improve missile defense capabilities, the 2009 budget provides $10.5 billion, an increase of $0.6 billion, for continued development of a multi-layered system to protect the U.S. and its allies from tactical and strategic ballistic missile attack.
 

Base Realignment and Closure
 
Current and future national security challenges require a more flexible, expeditionary force projection capability. Consequently, units stationed overseas will be brought back to bases in the United States. The Fiscal Year 2009 budget requests $9.5 billion to continue Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC). For the approved FY 2005 Base Realignment and Closure recommendations, the Budget fully funds 24 major realignments, 25 base closures, and 765 lesser actions. 
 
 
Improve Quality of Life for Service Members and Families
 
Recognizing that success in everything we do depends upon the dedication and skill of the men and women who willingly sacrifice their own comfort and safety to safeguard the freedom that all Americans enjoy every day, the Fiscal Year 2009 budget includes the resources necessary to provide the finest training, equipment and force protection for those who serve in harm’s way; the best possible care and medical facilities for the wounded, ill, and injured; a high quality of life for Service members and their families; and various incentives to recruit and retain the all-volunteer force. 
 
 
With significant emphasis on the quality of life for personnel and families, the Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $107.8 billion in pay and benefits for 2.2 million active and reserve members, an increase of $9.6 billion or 9.7 percent over the Fiscal Year 2008 enacted level of $98.2 billion.
 
The Fiscal Year 2009 budget increases military pay by 3.4 percent. Since 2001, military pay has increased by an average of 37 percent.   In 2009, the average enlisted E-6 (Army Staff Sergeant) will see a pay increase of $1,289. The pay of the average O-3 (Army Captain or Navy Lieutenant) increases by $1,943 in FY 2009.
 
Sustain High Quality Health Care
 
To maintain exceptional health care benefits for 9.2 million eligible military members and their families, working-age retiree members and their families, and Medicare-eligible beneficiaries, the Fiscal Year 2009 budget provides $41.6 billion in Fiscal Year 2009 for the military health system. Our forces deserve and can expect world-class health care in the future, despite the rising cost of health care and congressionally expanded benefits. 
 
The Department will submit legislation to enact the recommendations of the Task Force on the Future of Military Health Care. These recommendations will help keep the generous military health benefits affordable and sustainable for current and future retired Service members and their families. 
 
Further, recognizing the compelling and critical need to provide world-class health and rehabilitative care to all warfighters who are wounded, ill, or injured in service to the Nation, the Department has begun and will continue to take action on the recommendations made by the President’s Commission on Care for America’s Returning Wounded Warriors.
 
Family Housing and Facilities
 
The budget also includes $3.2 billion, an increase of $300 million above the Fiscal Year 2008 enacted level, which will construct new family housing, improve existing housing, eliminate inadequate housing overseas, operate and maintain government-owned housing, and fund the privatization of 12,324 additional homes.
               
Summary
 
The request for $515.4 billion in the Fiscal Year 2009 budget sustains the President’s commitment to prevail in the Global War on Terror; sustain a high rate of military readiness and support; prepare for the wide range of current and future dangers that threaten the Nation in the years ahead; and improve the quality of life for Service members and their families.
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