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Point of Contact | Family Preview | Memorial Dedication | Mementos at the Memorial
Other Events | Storycorps | Project Compassion | Washington Post

Point of Contact at the Department of Defense

The Point of Contact for family members is Mark Ward. He can be reached by phone at (703) 588-0564 or by e-mail at mark.ward@osd.mil.

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Family Preview Times And Dates

The Pentagon Memorial will be open to family members and their guests only on the following dates and times:

  • 7 September from 1:30 p.m. until 9:00 p.m.
  • 8 September from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m.
  • 9 September from 8:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.

These times and dates will give all family members the opportunity to experience the Memorial in semi-private conditions and not for the first time on September 11th. There will be a table set up near the Memorial Entrance where you can check-in and pick up your tickets, pins, and ribbons for the Dedication Ceremony on September 11th. A Will Call station will also be available on Wednesday, September 10th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and September 11th beginning at 6:00 a.m. in Pentagon South Parking, Lane 16.

  • The Memorial site will be closed to everyone on September 10.
  • During the family preview times listed above, the interior Pentagon Memorial and Chapel will also be open to family members and their guests.

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Memorial Dedication

If you have checked-in during one of the preview dates/times, there is no need to check-in again on the morning of the dedication and you can proceed through security and to the family seating area. All guests will need to be seated by 8:00 a.m.

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Mementos At The Memorial

From time to time, it is expected that individuals or groups may leave personal mementos at the Memorial Park. These mementos will be handled as follows:

A. At the end of normal hours of operation, (8 pm EST or 10 pm EDST), the organization that is responsible for the maintenance of the Pentagon Memorial Park will collect all items left inside the Pentagon Memorial Park. Perishable items (such as flowers) will be discreetly discarded at a location outside the Pentagon Memorial Park site. Non-perishable items will be collected and cataloged (item description, date collected, location of collection, etc.) and stored for 30 days.

B. After 30 days, the organization responsible for maintenance of the Pentagon Memorial Park will provide a list of all items collected during the past 30 day to the Pentagon Building Management Office (PBMO). The Government and the Pentagon Memorial Fund (PMF) will review that list. The PMF will take possession of items they feel individual families might be interested in receiving and send those items to the specific family as appropriate. The PBMO and Pentagon Building Manager (PBM) will take possession of any remaining items that they would like to preserve within 30 days of being provided the list. All items not requested by the PBMO or the PMF will be discreetly disposed of by the organization responsible for the maintenance of the Pentagon Memorial Park in a manner acceptable to the PBMO.

Family members are welcome to bring a memento to the Pentagon Memorial Park on the family preview dates (September 7th, 8th and 9th), place it at the bench site, take photographs etc., but we ask that you take the memento with you. The Pentagon Memorial Park will need to be swept for security purposes before the dedication on September 11th and no items may be left in the park between the last family preview date (September 9th) and the dedication date on September 11th.

On September 11th, after the dedication ceremony, if you bring a memento, and once you have gone through security, you may place the memento at the bench site, take photographs etc. If you do not take the memento with you after you leave the Pentagon Memorial Park at the end of the dedication ceremony, then, the procedures described in A and B above will apply.

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Other Events

Additional events will be held in Washington, D.C. during the week of the Memorial Dedication. This information is passed along as a courtesy to these organizations and is not sponsored in any way by the Department of Defense. A point of contact is included for each event listed. These events do not require a response to the Department of Defense.

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StoryCorps

The National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center invites you to participate in the StoryCorps September 11th Initiative. We are honored to be working in partnership with StoryCorps, one of the largest oral history projects of its kind, to collect a remembrance for each of the lives lost in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In addition to being deposited at the Library of Congress, these 9/11 remembrances will be preserved in perpetuity as a part of the Memorial Museum's permanent collection.

We are sincerely grateful to our friends at the Pentagon Memorial and Washington Headquarters Services for helping us to make the StoryCorps program available to you on September 8th and 9th at the Pentagon. Memorial Museum and StoryCorps staff will work with you to record your remembrance, which can be up to 40 minutes long. Appointments take one hour and must be scheduled in advance. For more information about the program, suggested interview questions and/or to schedule your appointment, please contact Caitlin Zampella, the Memorial Museum's Director of Program Partnership Initiatives at (212) 312-8788 or czampella@sept11mm.org. We will work with you to coordinate access to the recording space at the Pentagon, either from the Memorial or the Metro entrance, as well as, the identification requirements that will be needed by Pentagon security. Space is limited, so please contact us if you are interested in participating in this important initiative.

For more general information about the StoryCorps September 11th Initiative visit: http://www.storycorps.net/special-initiatives/september-11th or to learn more about our partnership and to listen to StoryCorps edited segments visit: http://www.national911memorial.org/site/PageServer?pagename=StoryCorps2

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Project Compassion

Many of our 9/11 families are unaware of their eligibility for this special offering to obtain a gallery quality portrait of their loved one.

Since Project Compassion was founded in 2004, they have, as of July 1, shipped over 1,150 hero paintings to the loved ones of Americans who have died in active service, regardless of how or where, since September 11, 2001. These professionally framed, 18"x24" portraits of our military fallen men and women, created in oil on canvas and shipped to their families at no cost to them, are worth up to $10,000 each for similar works by their five professional, gallery represented, award winning portrait artists who selflessly have volunteered for this privilege for Project Compassion.

Yet this number tragically represents only 25% of the total number of post-9/11 military casualties of those families entitled to a Project Compassion hero portrait. Project Compassion is trying to reach out to the families of military loved ones - including those who died at the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, and all other military members who have died in active service.

Project Compassion does not judge the location or circumstances of death - whether illness, accident on or off base, suicide, or murder as well as overseas or combat casualties - any man or woman who has chosen to wear the American uniform during and since the attacks of September 11, 2001 is a hero to Project Compassion.

For full information on Project Compassion and their offering and their simple requirements to request your hero portrait, simply go to their website at www.heropaintings.com, or give them a call at (209) 966-3535, or write Marie Woolf, CEO and Executive Director, at Project Compassion, 3601 Old Highway, Catheys Valley CA 95306.

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Washington Post

The Washington Post is planning a special section for the dedication of the Pentagon Memorial. As part of this section, they are hoping to provide one specific memory of each person killed in the attack, written by a family member or close friend and accompanied by a photograph.

In up to 100 words, they would like to capture the essence of the person who died. Some examples are provided below, but we want you to feel free to tell your story in your own way.

If you have a photograph that particularly illustrates your memory, please email that to the address listed below. If not, any photograph will serve the purpose, as long as you feel that it captures the essence of the person. It can be any photo you like; it does not have to be a head shot.

Please send your memories and photos to memorial@washpost.com You can also send Mary Hadar questions at that address. If you would like to talk in person, you can call her at 807-964-1817. (This is my summer home, not an office number, but if you leave a number, I'll get back to you within 24 hours.) And if you choose not to participate, please email that information and we will not trouble you again.

Some memories and photos will be printed in the paper; all will be on the Post's web site.

Thank you for your assistance in honoring the Pentagon victims.

Sample Memories

Over the years, he developed a special signature that he used when he charged something, with curlicues and swoops and little birds flying around his name. It was a work of art! Each time he charged something, he would sign the paper and then stand back and wait for the salesperson to notice it, wait for the big grin. At those moments, his face was full of expectation.

She could whip up dinner for ten without even breaking a sweat, and she did it at every opportunity. I can see her wearing these big red oven mitts, lifting a casserole onto the counter, jabbering away with guests as if it was no big deal, didn't require much attention. But when you tasted it, you knew it did. And she always had a big goblet of wine she would sip when she cooked. Maybe that was her secret.

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