United States Department of Defense United States Department of Defense

Remembering Sept. 11, 2001 - Honoring the Victims of the Pentagon

Published Sept. 6, 2011
Sept. 11, 2001, marked the beginning of the war against terrorism. But it also brought to a tragic end a multitude of lives. Here, we honor those who died in the attack on the Pentagon.

Bios of the Victims

Samantha Lightbourn Allen

Mrs. Allen was working as an Army budget analyst on the south side of the Pentagon when American Airlines Flight 77 was flown into the building. She was a devoted public servant who had worked for the Army for many years.

She was also the mother of a son and a daughter. She gave her life for her country. Her family and friends and colleagues miss her.

We will not forget her.

Paul Wesley Ambrose

Dr. Ambrose was the seventh Luther Terry Fellow of the Association of Teachers of Preventative Medicine and Senior Clinical Advisor in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. He worked with the Surgeon General's office on the "Call to Action" on overweight and obesity. On Sept. 11, 2001, he was going to a conference in Los Angeles dealing with this problem. Sec. of Health and Human Services Tommy G. Thompson wrote: "Paul's colleagues... will always remember him for his dedication to his work, and his gentle personal qualities of friendliness and willingness to help others. His natural inquisitiveness made him a pleasure to work with." Paul Ambrose was a unique individual who had much to offer the world.

We will not forget him.

Craig Scott Amundson

Mr. Amundson was an enlisted specialist in the U.S. Army and worked as a multimedia illustrator for LTG Timothy J. Maude, the Deputy Chief of Staff of Personnel. He was the husband of Amber Amundson and the father of two children. Mr. Amundson received his Bachelor of Arts in Film Studies from the University of Iowa in Iowa City. He was the owner of, and graphic designer for, SockoDesign.com. He believed that his role in the Army could further the cause of peace throughout the world.

We will not forget him.

Melissa Rose Barnes

Ms. Barnes, 27, was promoted to yeoman third class in June 2000. She held an administrative job in telecommunications at the Pentagon and reported to the chief of Naval Operations. She had worked at the Navy's headquarters in the Pentagon for two years after holding several assignments since 1992, when she enlisted from Redlands, California.

Ms. Barnes began her naval service as a corpsman-a medical aide-at a naval hospital in Portsmouth, Virginia, and later received communications training in Mississippi. In 1997, she left the Navy but returned about nine months later. “She missed the military," said her former husband, Petty Officer 1st Class Chris Barnes. “She wanted to try something else, but she came back into it."

We will not forget her.

Max Beilke

Mr. Beilke, 69, was the last U.S. combat soldier to leave Vietnam. A retired Army master sergeant, he was working in the Pentagon on veterans' issues on Sept. 11, 2001.

Mr. Beilke was drafted into the Korean War and served almost a year in Vietnam as well. The Army listed him as the last soldier to leave Saigon on March 29, 1973, although Marines stayed until 1975. He retired in 1974 and held various jobs before he went to work for the Army as a civilian and began lobbying for veterans in 1984. “If they had problems, they'd come to him," said one of his sisters. “He liked being helpful to somebody."

We will not forget him.

Dr. Yeneneh Betru

Dr. Betru, 35, was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and immigrated to the United States in 1982 with the dream of becoming a physician. He completed his residency at Los Angeles County - USC Medical Center, and worked as the Director of Medical Affairs for IPC-The Hospitalist Company in Burbank, California. A pioneer in a new practice of medicine called hospitalist care, he traveled around the country training hundreds of physicians.

In 1998, after his grandmother died, he began creating a kidney dialysis clinic in Addis Ababa. With his own money, he acquired a half dozen dialysis machines, solutions and supplies. He was also a friend, a role model and a mentor to his younger siblings.

We will not forget him.

Kris Romeo Bishundat

Mr. Bishundat, 23, was born in Georgetown, Guyana and moved to Waldorf, Maryland at age two. Known to all as Romeo, he enlisted in the Navy in 1995 and served aboard the USS Yorktown and the USS Shreveport, where he provided computer accessibility distance learning and operated as the ship's webmaster. His division officer called him “one of the finest sailors to ever walk the decks of the Supergator."

IT2 Bishundat reported for duty at the Pentagon in May 2001 to the Chief of Naval Operations Telecommunications Center. In recognition of his dedication, the Shreveport has established the Kris Bishundat Learning Media Resource Center, housing nine computer terminals, educational materials and a small literary collection for over 700 sailors and Marines on board the ship.

We will not forget him.

Carrie Blagburn

Carrie Blagburn, 48, was a civilian budget analyst for the United States Army and worked in the Pentagon. Her husband, Leo, treasures the memories of their 23 years together- memories of trips, outings to dance clubs, church visits, the births and weddings of their children, the loving care Ms. Blagburn gave to their grandchildren. Among her survivors are their youngest daughter, Deanna, 16, and their son DeAndre, 22, a soldier who was in Saudi Arabia on a temporary assignment on Sept. 11.

We will not forget her.

Canfield D. Boone

Col. Boone had a wide array of command and staff assignments throughout his 31 years of service. After enlisting with the Indiana National Guard, he served with the 38th Infantry Division, where he attained the rank of staff sergeant. He later served in a variety of assignments. In 1986 he began his active Guard/Reserve career as the Assistant Professor of Military Science at Eastern Illinois University. His follow-on assignments included Personnel Staff Officer and Personnel Analyst; Assignments Officer; Chief, Military Personnel Services Directorate; and Army National Guard Advisor and Mobilization Integrator, Personnel Command, Arlington, Virginia. In 1998, he was assigned as the ARNG Personnel Policy Integrator in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Army Pentagon.

Col. Boone earned a B.S. degree from Butler University and a Master's Degree from Webster University. His awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Purple Heart, the Meritorious Service Medal (one Oak Leaf Cluster), the Army Commendation Medal (three Oak Leaf Clusters) and the Army Staff Identification Badge. His survivors include his wife, Linda, and his three sons, Chris, Andy and Jason.

We will not forget him.

Donna Marie Bowen

Ms. Bowen, 42, an employee of Verizon, had worked on contract in an Army budgeting office of the Pentagon for the last four years of a 23-year career with Verizon.

Born in Omaha, she grew up in Massachusetts and was a fan of the Boston Red Sox. She was the mother of Alexandra, 10, Eugene Jr., 8, and Anastasia, 6, and stepmother to Courtney, 19, and Erika, 21. For four years she was the leader of a Girl Scout troop. On Sundays, she taught catechism at Our Lady Help of Christians Catholic Church, which the family attended. Every Wednesday, she left work early to volunteer in her children's classrooms at Berry Elementary School in Waldorf. "She was totally family-oriented," said her husband, Eugene Bowen, Sr.

We will not forget her.

Allen P. Boyle

Mr. Boyle was born on October 3, 1970, in New York. He moved to Arizona as a young adult, where he met and married Ronda, a member of the U.S. Marine Corps. The couple was stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. When Ronda was honorably discharged, she and Allen moved to Virginia and were employed at the Pentagon. Allen was a loving husband, and father to Dylan, 3; Allen, 2; and a new addition to the Boyle family due December 5, 2001.

He was a loyal employee and a proud American. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

We will not forget him.

Bernard Brown

Bernard Brown, 11, was clever and quick witted, the kind of boy who kept his teachers on their toes. Estella Cleveland, who taught his fifth-grade class at Leckie Elementary School in Washington, D.C., loved him. "He used to give the fourth-grade teacher fits. But he turned it around last year. Everybody noticed it," she said.

That's why Cleveland gave Bernard's name to her best friend at Leckie, sixth-grade teacher Hilda Taylor, when Taylor asked whom she should take on a National Geographic trip to California. Taylor drove to Bolling Air Force Base, where Bernard lived with his parents, Bernard and Sinita Brown, in naval housing. Mrs. Brown drove the two travelers to Dulles International Airport. They died when their plane was crashed into the Pentagon.

Cleveland was devastated about Bernard's death. "He was fun-loving," she said. "He was the joy of the class."

We will not forget him.

Christopher Lee Burford

Christopher Lee Burford, of Hubert, North Carolina, joined the Navy shortly after finishing high school. The 23-year-old started his career at the Naval Training Center in Great Lakes, Illinois.

He then moved to the Fleet Training Center in Norfolk, Virginia, for a three-month stint before joining the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Telecommunications Center at the Pentagon in June 2000. Mr. Burford, a petty officer third class, was an electronics technician.

We will not forget him.

Charles Frank Burlingame III

American Airlines Capt. Charles Burlingame, an aeronautical engineer and honors graduate from the Navy's Top Gun fighter pilot school, had been known since he was a child as "Chic."

His style and his appreciation for rhythm and blues music belied a serious side: a life-long love of aviation and a discipline honed at the military academy and eight subsequent years of service in the Navy. In recent months, he had been helping to organize the 30th reunion of the Class of '71, making appearances at local schools to recruit students for the Naval Academy and raising funds for his alma mater.

Like many military pilots, Burlingame considered the most difficult job to be landing an F-4 fighter jet on the deck of an aircraft carrier as it pitched at sea in the dark of night. After he left the Navy, Burlingame was hired by American Airlines in 1989.

Friends and family remembered him as a man who was unabashedly patriotic, who embraced military life even after he retired from active and reserve duty. He remained active in the reserve, working until 1996 as a liaison in the Pentagon. News of his death, the day before his 52d birthday, drew outpourings from classmates around the world. "I'm sure Chic was fighting bravely to the end," one wrote to his wife Sheri, a flight attendant for American Airlines.

We will not forget him.

Daniel Martin Caballero

Naval Petty Officer 3rd Class Daniel Martin Caballero was born in Houston, Texas on Nov. 21, 1979. Known to his family as "Danny" and shipmates as "Cabby," he graduated from Stephen F. Austin High School in Fort Bend County, SugarLand, Texas, May 1998. After graduating from boot camp in 1998, Daniel entered an electronics training program in Great Lakes, Ill.. He was then assigned to Fleet Training Center in Norfolk, Va., where he continued his electronics training. Caballero then received orders to report for duty at the Pentagon to the Chief of Naval Operations Telecommunications Center. While stationed at the Pentagon he was NCTS Washington's Junior Sailor of the Year for 2000. His awards and decorations include: Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, and a Purple Heart.

Daniel is survived by his parents, Andres and Carmen; sisters, Andrea and Claudia; and numerous friends and family.

We will not forget him.

Jose O. Calderon-Olmedo

Jose O. Calderon-Olmedo, 44, graduated from InterAmerican University in Puerto Rico. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1982, completed basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO, and Advanced Individual Training at Ft. Jackson, SC. He held numerous positions, from Supply Clerk to Senior Logistics NCO. His tours include: Ft. Stewart, GA; two tours in Germany; Ft. Eustis, VA; South Korea; Ft. Campbell, KY; and his last assignment at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He was deployed to the Persian Gulf in support of Desert Storm.

His awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Medal (sixth Award), Army Achievement Medal (second Award), Good Conduct Medal (sixth Award), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (Numeral 3), Non Commissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (Numeral 3), National Defense Service Ribbon, Kuwait Liberation Medal, Defense of Southwest Asia Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal with three bronze stars, Air Assault Badge, Driver's Mechanic Badge, Army Support Unit Award, and the Army Staff Badge.

SFC Calderon is survived by his wife Gloria; his children, Vanessa; 10, Jose O. Jr., 3; his parents Mr. Saturnino Calderon, and Mrs. Petra Olmedo; and his sister Elizabeth.

We will not forget him.

Suzanne Marie Calley

Suzanne Calley, 43, was born in Auburn, CA, and died on American Airlines Flight 77. She loved to travel and had been all over the world with her husband, Frank Jensen. She was a Master SCUBA instructor and, along with her husband, taught classes in Monterey, CA, and led dive trips the world over.

She worked in the high tech field for over 15 years. As a manager of strategic alliances for Cisco Systems, in San Jose, CA, she worked with Cisco's major partners. At a memorial service in Monterey, several hundred people showed up and all remembered her smile. She was a very giving person, never expecting anything in return.

Ms. Calley had a passion for animals, especially her two Labrador retrievers, Hershey and Bandit. Her husband, Frank, "loved her more than life itself."

We will not forget her.

Angelene Carter

Angelene, a much loved and respected wife, mother, family member, co-worker, and friend, has left behind a strong legacy. Angelene is survived by her loving husband Fred A. Carter; her mother Leona D. Cash; two daughters, Angenette Cash and Freddye Jean Carter; three stepdaughters, Venus Scott, Victoria Carter, and Cheryl Carter; two sisters, Linda C. Reid and Deloise C. Thorne; and two brothers, Claude and Donnie Cash. She is predeceased by her father, James William Cash, a sister, Shirley T. Johnson, and a brother, James William Cash Jr.

Angelene was an "ordinary" person whose God-given vision and mission was to accomplish "extraordinary" goals in life. Her philosophy on life was validated every day by her quiet character and conduct, by insuring that her work assignments and performance supported the level of services and expectations of her superiors and professional peers. She exhibited outstanding strength and leadership, which served as an example to her family, co-workers, church, and friends.

Among the strong attributes that Angelene demonstrated were patience and prudence, advocacy for teamwork, and of utmost importance, a ministry of encouragement built around great subjects such as God's sovereignty, power, compassion, and forgiveness. After a full day of regimentation, she would conclude the day with a personal Bible meditation and reflection period followed by prayer. She was a valued member of the St. Paul Baptist Church of Capital Heights, Maryland, where she was a member of the Adult Usher Board and various Bible Study Groups.

Angelene moved steadfastly and cautiously to provide a positive and clearly defined work and family structure. She was a very focused and results-oriented person whose plan of action included responding in an exemplary fashion to whatever she was asked to do, and paying strict attention to operational details.

Angelene was also a dedicated servant of her nation. She gave twenty-six years of devoted government service, the last eight years in the Pentagon where she was a staff accountant for the Department of the Army. She loved her job and the people with whom she worked.

Angelene was an active and creative explorer, independent, self-confident, and an inquisitive learner. She was truly a loving gift of God, and will be missed by everyone who had the pleasure and honor to know her.

Sharon Ann Carver

Sharon Ann Carver, 38, was an accountant for the Department of the Army from 1991 to 2001. She received her Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration from the University of the District of Columbia and her MBA from Strayer University. She served the federal government for 16 years.

Born the sixth of seven children, Sharon was raised in the Washington, D.C. area by her mother, who nicknamed her "Little Emma," after her grandmother. She often volunteered to go on school field trips and attend Girl Scout meetings with her nieces. She was always motivating her nieces and nephews to pursue higher education. She enjoyed traveling, watching movies, and jazz.

She was baptized on Easter Sunday, 1996, at Free Gospel Deliverance Church in Coral Hills, MD. She was industrious and took great pride in doing her job well. She loved her country and was very patriotic.

We will not forget her.

William E. Caswell

Mr. Caswell, 54, was a physicist and former University of Maryland faculty member who worked as a civilian for the Navy. Born in Boston, the eldest of six children, he lived most of his life in Silver Spring, MD.

He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Maryland in three years. After being drafted into the Army during the Vietnam War, he resumed his studies at Princeton University, where he received a Ph.D. in physics in 1975, specializing in elementary particle theory. He later did postdoctoral work at Stanford and Brown.

He loved to dance and play competitive games, whether it was chess, bridge, volleyball, soccer, tennis, squash, or pool. “He was a good, caring, and loving man." said his wife, Jean.

Survivors include his wife, his daughter Jennifer, and his stepson Sean.

We will not forget him.

John J. Chada

A two-time Vietnam veteran, John J. Chada, 55, served in both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Army. He followed his long military career by working as an administrative assistant for the Department of Defense Information Management Support Center.

He was a member of the Moose Lodge in Manassas, VA, for 13 years, serving as Governor, Junior Governor, Membership Chair, President, Past President and Director of the Moose Legion. He served on the planning committee for the 2001 Moose Legion Convention and as Fourth District secretary of the Virginia Moose Association. He also earned his Fellowship Degree. A lifetime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, he also was a member of the American Legion.

He was a devoted husband, father, grandfather, uncle and friend. Survivors include Ginger, his wife of 30 years; daughter Tammy Merritt; two grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

We will not forget him.

Rosa Maria Chapa

Rosa Maria (Rosemary) Chapa, 63, graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School and attended Incarnate Word University in San Antonio, TX, her hometown.

She began her federal career in 1970 as a clerk-typist at Ramey Air Force Base, Puerto Rico, and eventually worked her way up to senior management officer in the Office of the Deputy Comptroller for Force Structure and Management, Office of the Comptroller, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Prior to her arrival in DIA, she served as a civilian with the Department of Air Force, the Defense Logistics Agency, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. During her 31-year career, she received numerous awards and honors, including the Joint Meritorious Civilian Service Award, awarded by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

"Despite her busy career, her family always came first," her family said.

She is survived by her husband Jose; children Grace, Julie, Elza, Roger and John; father Manuel Faz; two sisters; two brothers; and five grandchildren.

We will not forget her.

David Michael Charlebois

David Charlebois, 39, of Washington, D.C., was First Officer on American Airlines Flight 77.

Born in Morocco, David lived with his family in France and Arlington, VA, during his childhood. He graduated from Yorktown High School and attended Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida. After working as a corporate pilot, he began his career as a commercial pilot, first with US Air and then, for ten years, with American Airlines.

A special Memorial Mass and Service was held at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C. In attendance were Mayor Anthony Williams and a number of American Airlines pilots and flight attendants. David enjoyed flying and died doing what he loved best.

He is survived by his parents, Roland and Vivienne Charlebois of Arlington; his brother and sister; several nieces and a nephew.

We will not forget him.

Sarah M. Clark

Sarah M. Clark, 65, was a sixth-grade teacher at Backus Middle School in Washington, D.C. She received her bachelor's degree in Elementary Education from Winston-Salem State University and a master's degree in Urban Learning from George Washington University. She had taught in D.C. public schools since 1965.

On Sept. 11, she was on board American Airlines Flight 77 to chaperone a group of children going to Santa Barbara, Ca., for an ecology conference sponsored by the National Geographic Society. She is survived by two children.

We will not forget her.

Julian Theodore Cooper

Julian Cooper, 39, was a senior computer analyst for Litton PRC. He had worked in the U.S. Navy Command Center at the Pentagon for five years.

Known to his friends as Coop'a, he graduated from Bladensburg High School and attended the University of Maryland. After college he joined the U.S. Navy, where he served for 13 years. Later he was a Navy reservist.

He was a devoted husband, a protective son and a supportive brother. He was always willing to help those around him. He was a patriot.

He is survived by his wife, mother, grandmother, one brother and two sisters.

We will not forget him.

Asia Cottom

Asia Cottom, 11, was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77. She had just started sixth grade at Bertie Backus Middle School in Washington, D.C., where her father worked, and she was traveling to California with Sarah Clark, a teacher, to participate in a National Geographic Society ecology conference.

School employees said Asia was eager to learn and pleased to be at the campus where her father helped to coach basketball, patrol the halls and serve as a book clerk. They said Asia was a kindhearted girl who helped other students with learning difficulties.

On the night of the tragedy, Asia's mother told her teacher: "My baby got her wings today."

We will not forget her.

Ada Marie Davis

Ada Marie Davis, 57, worked as an accountant for the government for 31 years. She served at the Pentagon under the Secretary of the Army, Resource Management, for over six years and put off retirement twice to ensure that her successor was prepared for the job.

As the oldest of ten children, she helped her mother and father raise her younger brothers and sisters. Her creativity, patience, strong will, determination, love and vigor for life left its mark on everyone she encountered. She was a wife, a friend, a patriot, a leader, a godmother, a grandmother and a mother.

Survivors include her husband, Nolton Jr.; four children, Zenovia, Yolanda, Rosslyn and Christopher; three sisters and three brothers.

We will not forget her.

James Daniel Debeuneure

James Daniel Debeuneure, 58, of Upper Marlboro, Md., was a 5th grade teacher at Ketchum Elementary School in Washington, D.C.

He earned a B.S. in psychology and education at Johnson C. Smith University, and during his career worked for the Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education, Celanese Corp., C&P Telephone, and the Army Times. He also co-owned an upholstery and drapery shop. He was a member of First Baptist Church of Highland Park.

Mr. Debeuneure loved to teach, and devoted his time to sports, educational trips and student safety patrolling. He enjoyed playing golf and collecting black art.

Survivors include his daughter, Jalin; two sons, Jacques and DeForrest; and a brother.

We will not forget him.

Gerald F. DeConto

Capt. Gerald F. DeConto, 44, was director of the current operations and plans branch of the U.S. Navy Command Center. He was organizing the Navy's response to the World Trade Center attack when he died in the plane crash at the Pentagon.

The son of a school teacher and a town building inspector, DeConto earned a physics degree from the U.S. Naval Academy, where he played rugby. He reported to the USS Excel as a damage control assistant, later serving as engineering officer and executive officer. He then became operations officer on the USS Fresno.

After earning a Master's degree in mechanical engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Ca., he served as chief engineer on the USS Hewitt, then as an aide to the assistant chief of naval operations for surface warfare. He was named executive officer on the USS Lake Erie in 1991. After that he was assistant operations officer for Carrier Group 7. After earning a Master's degree in national security and strategic studies at the Naval War College, he was commanding officer of the USS Simpson from 1998 to 2000, and chief of staff for the Standing Naval Force Mediterranean.

He enjoyed sailing, running with his two dogs, and giving his brothers pointers about coaching soccer. Survivors include his mother, two brothers and two sisters.

We will not forget him.

Rodney Dickens

Rodney Dickens, 11, was in the sixth grade at Ketcham Elementary School in Washington, D.C. On Sept. 11, he was traveling with a teacher on board American Airlines Flight 77 to California.

Rodney grew up in tough Washington neighborhoods, but he always made the honor roll. He loved reading, playing computer games, playing with his siblings, and watching professional wrestling on television. He was close to his mother, LaShawn, who is raising the children with the help of her large extended family.

Survivors include his mother, two sisters and two brothers.

We will not forget him.

Jerry D. Dickerson

Army Lt. Col. Jerry D. Dickerson, 41, worked at the Pentagon on operations research and systems analysis. Dickerson lived with his wife, Page, and two children, Will, 11, and Beth, 15, in Springfield. He was born in Mississippi, studied economics at Mississippi State and received a Master's Degree in Engineering from Texas A&M University.

He started out in ROTC, then served in the National Guard and joined the Army in 1983, said his brother-in-law, David Dantzler.

He may not have been well-known among civilians, Dantzler said, "but he had an immediate impact on anybody he met along the way."

Eddie Dillard

Eddie Dillard, 54, was born in Alabama, attended Tennessee State University, and earned a B.A. in history from Bishop College.

His first job was with Southland Corp. in Dallas. He later opened his own 7-Eleven store in East Palo Alto, Ca., and then went to work for Phillip Morris, where he retired in 1997 as a district manager after 19 years of service.

In retirement he began a new career in real estate, buying and selling property throughout the U.S. He loved history, reading newspapers, and playing dominoes and bid whist.

Survivors include his wife Rosemary; son Edrick; two brothers and a sister.

We will not forget him.

Johnnie Doctor, Jr.

Johnnie Doctor, Jr., 32, was a U.S. Navy information systems technician first class.

He was in the Navy 14 years, traveling from Japan to Florida, Russia to Australia. When he returned from far-flung ports, he'd always bring a T-shirt or other mementos for his wife Andrea and his stepchildren Anthony and Lydeda.

"He loved everything about the service," Andrea said. "It was his family, too." The couple were married in 1995 and lived near Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, D.C.

He had recently started criminology classes at the University of the District of Columbia, with thoughts of becoming a state trooper. "He was so full of life and excited for what was about to come," said his wife.

We will not forget him.

Bob Dolan

Bob Dolan, 43, was strategy and concepts branch head under the chief of naval operations at the Pentagon.

A U.S. Naval Academy graduate, he was commander of the USS John Hancock by the age of 40. During his 20-year Navy career, he served in Bahrain, the Arabian Gulf, the Adriatic Sea and the Mediterranean, at various naval stations and on the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He earned a master's degree from the National War College and received several decorations, including the Meritorious Service Medal.

He coached weekly Little League games for his son and chaperoned school dances for his daughter. He could quote Shakespeare and Monty Python in the same sentence. He was equally comfortable commanding a billion-dollar ship and chatting at the church picnic.

"Bob Dolan was the best and the brightest this country had to offer to the altar of freedom," said his wife Lisa.

Survivors include his wife, his son Beau and his daughter Rebecca.

We will not forget him.

William H. Donovan

Commander William H. Donovan was an action officer on the Navy Staff (Strategy and Concepts) at the Pentagon.

A 1982 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he served at NAS Whiting Field and NAS Corpus Christi, where he was on the Commodore's List for flight and academic excellence and designated a naval aviator.

After flight training at NAS Jacksonville, he served at NAS Brunswick and was deployed to Iceland and Sicily, where he participated in Operation Desert Shield. In 1995, he earned an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Ca., and was awarded the Adm. William Adger Moffett Award (Aeronautics). He served on the USS George Washington in Norfolk, Va., and qualified as a tactical action officer and command duty officer in port.

In 1998, he served at NAS Whidbey Island and was later deployed to Diego Garcia. In July, 2000, he transferred to the Pentagon as an action officer on the Navy Staff (Policy and Doctrine). In December he moved to Strategy and Concepts.

He was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (two awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (three awards) and numerous unit ribbons.

Survivors include his wife Elaine; three children; his parents; two brothers and two sisters.

We will not forget him.

Charles A. Droz

Charles Droz was vice president of software development for EMSolutions, an Arlington, Va., firm.

Prior to joining EMSolutions, Mr. Droz spent 20 years in the U.S. Navy, where he developed high capacity signal processors, multi-processor application software and innovative signal processing algorithms. He engaged in system engineering consulting, development of geographically distributed, web-based systems, and development of an ARPA project demonstrating rapid object-oriented application development through frameworks, components, and application templates.

He earned a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Grove City College and an M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School.

We will not forget him.

Patrick Dunn

Commander Patrick Dunn, 39, worked as a planner and strategist in the Navy Command Center at the Pentagon.

The son of a Newark policeman, he came from a Navy family. His father served in World War II and the Korean War. CDR Dunn and one of his brothers were U.S. Naval Academy graduates.

"Pat's favorite thing was to be at sea," said his wife Stephanie, who fondly remembers waving the blue-and-gold Naval Academy flag from the roof of their home in Italy when the USS LaSalle headed out to sea with her husband, who was the ship's executive officer, on board. "If the ship was rocking," she said, "he was happy."

CDR Dunn was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

We will not forget him.

Edward Thomas Earhart

Petty Officer 1st Class Edward Thomas Earhart, 26, was an aerographer's mate in the U.S. Navy.

The Salt Lick, Ky., native began his military career with basic training in Great Lakes, Il., before moving on to the Naval Reserve Center in Lexington, Ky., and the Naval Technical Training Unit at Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi. He spent three years in Pearl Harbor, HI., before coming to Washington last November.

We will not forget him.

Barbara Edwards

Barbara Edwards, 58, taught French and German at Palo Verde High School in Las Vegas, NV. On Sept. 11, 2001, she was returning home to Las Vegas on American Airlines Flight 77 after attending a wedding in Connecticut and visiting friends in Washington, D.C.

Born in Frankfurt, Germany, she came to the U.S. when she was a child. She grew up in Michigan and lived in various parts of the country. "My mom never let little things get us down," said one of her sons, Capt. Scott Edwards, 28, a Marine pilot in Beaufort, S.C. "Even if something went wrong, it was never the focus."

Survivors include her stepfather, Jack Vander Baan, her mother, Lissy, and sons Mike, Scott and Douglas.

We will not forget her.

Robert Elseth

Robert Elseth was a Naval Reserve officer working in the Navy Command Center at the Pentagon. He also was a founding partner of Delta Resources Inc., a defense consulting firm.

A 1987 graduate of Ohio State University, he served 10 years on active duty in the U.S. Navy, serving on the USS Claude V. Ricketts, USS Donald B. Beary and the USS John Rodgers. He also was an instructor at the Surface Warfare Officer School in Newport, R.I., where he was recognized as the Junior Officer of the Year for Newport Naval Ashore Commands. He later served as an officer in the Naval Reserve in a number of units.

He was active in his church as a Sunday school teacher for first graders, and as a girls soccer coach.

Survivors include his wife Annette, daughter Faith, parents Berta and Curtis Elseth, two brothers and a sister.

We will not forget him.

Jamie Lynn Fallon

Jamie Lynn Fallon, 23, was a U.S. Navy petty officer third class. She worked in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Support Activity at the Pentagon, where she was a storekeeper.

Her Navy career began with basic training at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, II. From there, she spent three months at the Naval Technical Training Center in Meridian, MS., followed by a stint at the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station in Bahrain.

She spent more than two years on the USNS Concord, a fleet support ship, before moving to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Support Activity at the Pentagon.

We will not forget her.

The Falkenberg-Whittington Family

Charles S. Falkenberg, 45, a software engineer with ECOlogic Corp., his wife Leslie A. Whittington, 45, a Georgetown University associate professor, and their daughters Zoe, 8, and Dana, 3, were passengers on board American Airlines Flight 77. The family was on the first leg of a journey to Australia, where Prof. Whittington had secured a visiting fellow position at the Australian National University in Canberra.

The Rev. Barbara Wells, who officiated at a memorial service at Paint Branch Unitarian Universalist Church, remembered Prof. Whittington as an irreverent economist with a "razor-sharp wit," and her husband as a "bike-riding, mountain climbing, love-to-be-at-home-with-his-girls kind of dad." Zoe, she said, had "perfect ballerina feet" and Dana "filled the room with her curly-headed smile."

"Our hearts are filled with terrible pain," said Rev. Wells.

Survivors include the parents of the couple.

We will not forget them.

James Joe Ferguson

James Joe Ferguson, 39, was director of geography education outreach at the National Geographic Society. He was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77, accompanying three Washington, D.C. public school teachers and three students on a National Geographic-sponsored field trip to the Channel Islands off Santa Barbara, CA.

Mr. Ferguson, who was known by his middle name, graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi and had worked at National Geographic for 14 years. He liked helping children learn about geography. When he bought presents for his brother's children, he always bought geography books or a puzzle of the U.S. "Work and traveling was his life – and his family," said his mother, Barbara Harrell.

Survivors include his mother and a brother.

We will not forget him.

Amelia Fields

Amelia Virginia Fields, who turned 46 on Sept. 11, worked in the Pentagon as a civilian secretary for the U.S. Army. She had been transferred there only two days earlier from Fort Belvoir in Virginia.

She was born in Princess Anne, MD., and met her future husband, William, in high school. After they married, she accompanied him on his military assignments and volunteered at Navy hospitals. She was active at the First Mount Zion Baptist Church in Dumfries, VA.

Survivors include her husband, a retired Marine Corps master sergeant, and their two children, William, Jr., 23, and Shantell Fields, 18.

We will not forget her.

Gerald P. Fisher

Gerald P. Fisher, 57, was a consultant for Booz, Allen & Hamilton. He and two other employees of the firm had gone to the Pentagon to brief Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude, the Army's deputy chief of staff for personnel, on an improved system for military employees' survivor benefits.

Known by his childhood nickname "Geep," he earned a bachelor's degree from San Francisco State University, a master's in social work from CSU-Sacramento, a master's in city planning and a doctorate in social policy and counseling from the University of Pennsylvania. His long career in government, academia and private industry included six years as an associate professor at the universities of Texas and Wisconsin. He spent 14 years as a manpower specialist and principal with Booz, Allen. "He was warm, loving, compassionate and nonjudgmental," said his wife Christine.

Survivors include his mother, Muriel Fisher, his wife, his son Jonathan and daughter Serena Leigh Dugan.

We will not forget him.

Darlene Ellen Embree Flagg

Darlene Ellen "Dee" Embree Flagg was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77 with her husband, retired U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Wilson "Bud" Falor Flagg.

A 1960 graduate of the University of California at Santa Barbara, she taught school in Annapolis, MD., and married Bud when he graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1961. She was a devoted Navy spouse, mother and grandmother, and was active in the communities where she lived. In Ridgefield, CT., she renovated Keeler Tavern and operated the gift shop. She was president of the Ridgefield Woman's Club. In Millwood, VA., she was a member of the Blue Ridge Hunt Club and Greenway Garden Club. She was a member of Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church in Winchester, VA. She was also an artist who helped foster children's talent.

Survivors include her two sons, Marc and Michael, a sister and four grandchildren.

We will not forget her.

Wilson Falor Flagg

Retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Wilson “Bud" Falor Flagg was on American Airlines Flight 77 on Sept. 11 with his wife Darlene Ellen "Dee" Embree Flagg.

A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he went on to flight training and was designated a Naval aviator. He was deployed three times to Southwest Asia on the USS Oriskany, two of them combat cruises. He left active duty in 1967 and joined American Airlines and the Naval Reserve.

As a Naval Reserve officer, he commanded two F-8 squadrons and two augment units, U.S. Naval Air Forces Eastern Atlantic and Reserve Readiness Command Region Two. He served in the Pentagon as special assistant to the deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for reserve affairs and as assistant chief of Naval operations for air warfare. He also served as assistant chief of staff, readiness and training, on the staff of commander Naval Air Forces U.S. Atlantic Fleet, and as deputy for reserve affairs on the staff of commander in chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He was promoted to rear admiral in 1986 and retired in 1995 with two stars. He retired in 1998 from American Airlines as a captain, flying international flights.

He was a member of the Blue Ridge Hunt Club and a member of Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church in Winchester, VA.

Survivors include two sons, Marc and Michael, and a sister.

We will not forget him.

Matthew Michael Flocco

Navy Aerographer's Mate 2nd Class Matthew Michael Flocco, 21, worked in the Pentagon. He had recently been transferred off the night shift.

He was a committed athlete who ran every other day and went home to Delaware on weekends to play softball in a community league. He loved meteorology. During his senior year in high school, he began to think of joining the Navy, and he and some friends dropped in to a local recruiting center. Recalled his mother, Sheila: "The more he listened to the recruiter, the more he wanted to go." He enlisted right after graduation.

"We're just so proud of him," said his father, Michael. "He dedicated his life to his job and his friends."

We will not forget him.

Sandra Nadine Foster

Sandra Nadine Foster, 41, was a senior management officer for the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) assigned to the Office of the Deputy Comptroller for Force Structure and Management, Office of the Comptroller.

She had worked for the federal government since 1977, starting as an aide for the Federal Power Commission. In 1978 she joined the Department of Energy and then the DIA. Throughout her career, she received numerous awards for outstanding performance.

"Her radiance could light up a room or a heart," said her husband, Kenneth. "Our girls on the basketball team knew her as Ms. Coach. She was a pillar of strength and she shared that strength."

Survivors include her husband, stepsons Kyle and Kellen, her mother Barbara Hill, and a brother.

We will not forget her.

Richard Gabriel

Richard Gabriel was a retired U.S. Marine Corps officer and Vietnam War veteran who was awarded a Purple Heart for wounds received in action. At a young age, he made it his mission to engage in life again after the amputation of his leg.

He had a calm demeanor, a pervasive serenity and a powerfully engaging smile. He embraced responsibility, appreciated life's second chances, had integrity and was honest to a fault. His perspective on life helped him succeed in his most gratifying endeavor of all: being a dedicated husband to his wife Anne, father to his five children, and a loyal son to his parents. He was a true gentleman.

We will not forget him.

Lawrence Daniel Getzfred

U.S. Navy Capt. Lawrence Daniel Getzfred, 57, was the branch head for Joint Operations and Plans on the staff of the Deputy Director of Plans, Policy and Operations.

He began his Navy career as an antisubmarine warfare technician. He attended DeAnza College and Santa Clara University in California and earned a degree in mathematics. He later received a teaching credential. In 1972, after Aviation Officer Candidate School, he was commissioned an ensign. In 1973, he was designated a Navy flight officer. He served as a tactical coordinator instructor at Moffett Field, CA, and then from 1980-1983 he was stationed in Scotland in a personal exchange program with the Royal Air Force. He served on the staff of Patrol Wing 10 at Moffett Field from 1983-1984, then joined VP-46. In 1987, he became executive officer of VP-40, a squadron of P-3s based at Moffett Field. He led his squadron on deployment to Japan and Okinawa. He assumed command of the squadron from 1988 to 1989. After completing his tour, he earned a master's degree in foreign affairs and strategic planning at the Naval War College.

He spent the next three years as an action officer on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon, serving in the strategic planning and policy department of the Joint Staff. He was promoted to the rank of captain in 1993. He also served as the chief of staff of Patrol Wings Pacific.

During his military career, Getzfred received numerous awards and commendations for achievement, good conduct and meritorious service. He was a great teacher and leader. He was also a wonderful husband, father, brother, son and naval officer.

Survivors include his wife, Patricia, and two daughters, Larissa and Kristina.

We will not forget him.

Cortez Ghee

Cortez Ghee was a budget analyst for the Department of the Army.

He attended Montgomery, Prince George's and Cantonsville colleges. Prior to his job with the Army, he worked with the Maryland Air National Guard, the Department of Health and Human Services in Baltimore, MD., the General Services Administration in Washington, D.C., and served a tour with the U.S. Air Force.

His favorite sport was football. He loved photography, music, reading, playing chess, stamp collecting and traveling. He was a devoted husband to his wife of 22 years, and he was a loving son, brother, uncle and friend.

We will not forget him.

Brenda Colbert Gibson

Brenda Colbert Gibson, 59, was a budget analyst for Resource Services Washington in the office of the administrative assistant to the Secretary of the Army.

She held positions in several different agencies during more than thirty years of service in the federal government. She was a loyal employee and a woman of integrity. Friends throughout the Pentagon remarked about her cordial greeting and pleasant smile. She enjoyed comic books, cartoons, jellybeans and sports. She was the ultimate Redskins fan.

Survivors include her husband, Joseph M. Gibson, III, her son Eric, her parents, Florence and LaBrent Colbert, and four sisters.

We will not forget her.

Ronald F. Golinski

U.S. Army Col. (Ret.) Ronald F. Golinski held many positions during his 36-year Army career, including director of the Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate at the Army Reserve Personnel Command in St. Louis, MO. His awards include the Legion of Merit and the Meritorious Service Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters. After his retirement in 1996, he worked as a civilian in the office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel.

His colleagues remember him as a hard worker with an unmatched sense of humor. He loved golf and he loved Sylvester and Crackers, his favorite cats.

Survivors include his wife of 23 years, Irene; three daughters, Marcellia Golinski-Potler, Amanda and Sara; two stepchildren, Paula Smith and David Eschenbaum; three daughters by a previous marriage, Christine, Dawn and Michelle; his mother Marion; two brothers and two sisters.

We will not forget him.

Ian J. Gray

Ian J. Gray, 55, was a principle at McBee Associates, a financial healthcare firm.

He was born in England and spent much of his childhood in Scotland with his younger sister Anne. He became a chartered accountant at Cambridge University. He came to the U.S. in 1968 to work for Blue Cross/Blue Shield in Chicago. He later moved to Maryland, where he subsequently joined McBee Associates. In 1979, he became a naturalized U.S. citizen.

Survivors include his wife Ana; a stepson, Lt. Charles C. Raley, USN; and a daughter, Lisa Gray, from a previous marriage.

We will not forget him.

Diane Hale-McKinzy

Diane Hale-McKinzy, 38, was a deaconess in the Christian Hope Center Church.

She served in the military from 1981 until 1985 and received numerous awards and commendations. She later joined the civil service, working more than 20 years for her country. In 1995, she was ordained as a deaconess in the Christian Hope Center Church. She was also chief financial officer for Christian Hope Bible College and Believer's Academy.

She was faithful, dedicated and devoted to God, her family and the church. She was also an accomplished entrepreneur who loved singing and drawing and spending time with her family. She touched the lives of many.

Survivors include her husband Gary; daughter Connie E. Hale; step-daughter, Ebony C. McKinzy; two sisters and four brothers.

We will not forget her.

Stan Hall

Stan Hall, 68, was director of program management for Raytheon in Washington, D.C. He was on board American Airlines Flight 77.

A 17-year veteran of the company formerly known as Hughes, Mr. Hall helped develop and build antiradar technology. "He was our 'dean' of electronic warfare, and his objective was always the protection of the American servicemen," said one colleague.

He was a veteran of the U.S. Army during the Korean War, and an active member of the South Bay Church of God for 11 1/2 years. He was a Sunday school teacher and served on the board of trustees.

Survivors include his wife of 43 years, Judie, son Randy, and daughters Jane and Susan.

We will not forget him.

Carolyn Halmon

Carolyn Halmon, 49, worked as a budget analyst for the U.S. Army at the Pentagon.

Herman, 49, her husband of nearly 30 years, said she was "a churchgoing person." She was dedicated to her charity work at the National Church of God in Fort Washington, and she loved gardening at their Washington home. The couple were looking forward to retiring in Hilton Head, S.C., where they had bought a condominium.

Survivors include her son Stan and daughter Alisha.

We will not forget her.

Michele Heidenberger

Michele Heidenberger, 52, was the senior flight attendant aboard American Airlines flight 77.

A flight attendant for American for approximately 30 years, she received the Professional Flight Attendant Award from the airline last April 12. She was a loving mother, an adoring wife, a caring aunt, a devoted daughter and sister, and a special friend to many. She devoted many hours working with children at St. Ann's Infant and Maternity Home, the American Red Cross, Stone Ridge of the Sacred Heart, Mater Del and Gonzaga College High School, as well as community activities in Chevy Chase, MD., where she lived.

Survivors include her husband Thomas, a captain for U.S. Airways; daughter Alison and son Thomas; mother Mary MacDonald and three sisters.

We will not forget her.

Sheila Hein

Sheila Hein, 51, was in the Pentagon on Sept. 11 as part of an Army internship, studying manpower analysis.

She joined the U.S. Navy after high school and spent 10 years as a photographer. She later began a career in computer graphics, working on government contracts. She earned a bachelor's degree from Columbia Union College and planned to get a master's degree. She belonged to a steam train club, loved to read and garden, and recently convinced her long-time partner, Peggy Neff, that they should buy bicycles and ride together. "We rode them six times," said Neff.

We will not forget her.

Ronald Hemenway

Ronald Hemenway, 37, was an electronics technician for the U.S. Navy.

He joined the Navy in 1994. While stationed on the USS LaSalle, based in Italy, he met and married his wife, Marinella. He rose to become a petty officer first class.

He was dedicated to his family and eager to improve himself as a coworker and neighbor. He loved to read. He was a man who would rather give to others than receive. He and his wife were making plans to buy their first house.

Survivors include his wife; children Stephan, 3, and Desiree, 1; parents Robert and Shirley, two brothers and three sisters.

We will not forget him.

Wallace Cole Hogan, Jr.

U.S. Army Maj. Wallace Cole Hogan, Jr., served in the office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans at the Pentagon.

His 21year Army career included service as a commander of the 19th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Colorado Army National Guard, and the Alabama Army National Guard. He later served as detachment commander of the 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Fort Lewis, WA., and as commander of the Special Forces Instructor Detachment, U.S. Army Jungle Operations Training Battalion in Panama.

He received numerous awards and decorations. His supervisor said he was "an extremely dedicated officer with great attention to detail." His father described him as "a soldier's soldier who loved the Army."

He enjoyed cycling, woodworking and military history, especially the Civil War. He and his wife, Maj. Pat Hogan, an Air Force doctor, often visited national battlefields. The couple met when Cole fell ill in Panama; she was his doctor.

Survivors include his wife and parents, Wallace and Jane.

We will not forget him.

Jimmy Ira Holley

Jimmy Holley, 54, worked as an accountant at the Pentagon.

He was educated at J. D. Thompson High School in Alexandria City, AL., and earned a degree in accounting at Montgomery College in Maryland. He retired from the U.S. Army after 15 years of service.

Survivors include his wife Martha Jackson Holley; his children Kelly and Daniel; three sisters and six brothers.

We will not forget him.

Angela Houtz

Angela Houtz, 27, was a senior analyst at the Pentagon for the Office of Naval Intelligence.

A salutatorian in high school, she won a full scholarship to the University of Maryland. She interned at the Office of Naval Intelligence in Suitland, MD. After graduation, she was hired as a regional analyst, specializing in Latin American affairs.

She later worked for the Chief of Naval Operations and served as the Naval Intelligence Watch Officer in the Navy Command Center. She returned to the Office of Naval Intelligence until her appointment as a senior analyst at the Pentagon.

She was active in her church and involved in programs that fed the homeless. She was dedicated to her family and friends. She loved her country and her job, and was considered a "shipmate" by her Navy coworkers.

We will not forget her.

Brady Kay Howell

Brady Kay Howell, 26, was a presidential management intern doing intelligence work for the chief of naval operations at the Pentagon.

A former Eagle Scout, he was active in sports. He graduated from Utah State University and earned a master's degree at Syracuse University. He loved his job, which often involved top-secret work. He taught Sunday school in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Survivors include his wife Elizabeth; parents Kenneth and Jeanette; three brothers and a sister.

We will not forget him.

Peggie Hurt

Peggie Hurt, 36, worked as an accountant in the Pentagon for the U.S. Army. She had been on the job only two weeks.

She graduated with honors from Virginia State University, then worked for the government and the National Guard.

"She was definitely a people person," said her cousin, Delores Hardy. She was a member, along with cousins and other relatives, of the Hurt Family gospel singing group. Her favorite song was "The Battle Is Not Yours, It's the Lord's." With her voice, said her cousin, she could always lead.

We will not forget her.

Stephen Neil Hyland, Jr.

Stephen Neil Hyland, Jr., 45, who went by his middle name, worked at the Pentagon on personnel issues as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army.

He graduated from the University of Notre Dame and joined the military nearly 21 years ago. He loved history and socializing with his friends. Shortly after joining the military, he said he'd like his epitaph to read: Born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad. "You look back, and all you think about is him laughing," said his father, Stephen. "When he was in a room, everybody gathered around him."

Survivors include three sisters and a brother.

We will not forget him.

Robert Joseph Hymel

Robert Joseph Hymel, 55, was a senior management officer for the Defense Intelligence Agency.

A graduate of the University of Southwestern Louisiana, he joined the U.S. Air Force and was a decorated Vietnam combat pilot. He flew B-52 bombers while assigned to the Strategic Air Command. In 1974, he earned an MBA from Western New England College. During his 24-year military career, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart and the Meritorious Service Medal, among others. He was a veteran of Vietnam and Desert Shield/Desert Storm. He retired in 1993 with the rank of lieutenant colonel and began a civilian career.

He supported his church and the Knights of Columbus. He loved to play golf and tinker around the house. He was an avid Redskins fan. He loved his family and his country.

Survivors include his wife Pat; daughter Natalie; mother Elsie; a brother and a sister.

We will not forget him.

Lacey B. Ivory

Sgt. Maj. Lacey B. Ivory, 42, was senior enlisted military assistant in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs.

He earned degrees from Des Moines Area Community College, the State University of New York and the University of Maryland, where he received a master's degree in education.

His 24-year career in the U.S. Army included tours of duty at Ft. Riley, Kan.; Ft. Jackson, S.C.; Germany; the Army Recruiting Command in Des Moines, Ia.; Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind.; and the Army Space Command at Peterson AFB in Colorado. His awards and decorations include the Purple Heart, Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Commendation Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Achievement Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Army Good Conduct Medal.

He was a founding member of the Heidelberg Gospel Service and a deacon at Emmanuel Missionary Baptist Church in Colorado. Always eager to help young people, he was active in Big Brothers.

Survivors include his wife, Lt. Col. Deborah W. Ivory; daughters Adenika, Maisha, Quawana and Rashida; parents John and Redia, and seven brothers and sisters.

We will not forget him.

Bryan Creed Jack

Dr. Bryan Creed Jack, 48, was director of the programming and fiscal economics division in the Office of Program Analysis and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Defense. He was responsible for designing and maintaining the Future Years Defense Program and developing the fiscal guidance by which the Secretary of Defense allocates funding to the military and defense agencies.

A former National Merit Scholar and Presidential Scholar from Texas, he graduated from the California Institute of Technology and studied in Japan as a Henry Luce Scholar. He later earned an MBA at Stanford University and a doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland. In 2000, he was appointed adjunct professor of economics at George Washington University.

He joined the Defense Department as an analyst in 1978 and was twice awarded the Defense Exceptional Service Medal, in 1998 and 2000.

We will not forget him.

Steven D. Jacoby

Steven D. Jacoby, 43, was the chief operating officer for Metrocall, Inc., a wireless data and messaging company. He was a passenger on board American Airlines Flight 77, heading for a seminar in Los Angeles.

Mr. Jacoby, who was known to colleagues as Jake, was an executive with FirstPage USA from 1988 until its merger with Metrocall in 1994. “He wanted to do everything he could for our company," said Vince Kelly, Metrocall's chief financial officer. “He was not only a business colleague but a close personal friend."

Survivors include his wife, Kim, and children Nicholas, Jesse and Jenna.

We will not forget him.

Dennis Johnson

Lt. Col. Dennis "Den" Johnson, 48, was the chief of personnel services at the Pentagon, working directly for the deputy chief of staff for personnel.

He served the U.S. Army in a wide variety of command and staff assignments during his 25-year career. He treated everyone in his department like a member of his family, making sure each knew they could come to him if they had a problem of any kind.

He loved gardening, working in the yard and spending time with his family. He also enjoyed bird-watching. His wife of 22 years, Joyce, described him as "quiet, gentle, fun-loving and extremely dedicated to his job."

Survivors include his wife and daughters Dawn, 20, and Cassie, 16.

We will not forget him.

Judith L. Jones

Judith L. Jones, who worked in the Pentagon, sent the following email to some friends less than an hour before the Sept. 11 terrorist attack. Michelle Bush, her daugher, said it "epitomizes the kind of friend she was."

You're...
my friend, my companion,
through good times and bad.
My friend, my buddy,
through happy and sad.
Beside me you stand,
beside me you walk,
you're there to listen,
you're there to talk,
with happiness,
with smiles,
with pain and tears,
I know you'll be there, throughout the years!
You are all good friends to me and I am grateful to you.

We will not forget her.

Ann Campana Judge

Ann Campana Judge, 49, arranged trips around the world for National Geographic Society writers, photographers and executives. She was on board American Airlines Flight 77 with six Washington D.C. students and teachers on a National Geographic-sponsored trip to the Channel Islands in California.

A graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University, she worked for National Geographic for 22 years. Her colleagues recalled her enthusiasm for travel and her passion for geography. John M. Fahey, Jr., president and chief executive of the society, called her "an extraordinary lady – well known and loved by almost everybody here." On Thanksgiving, she often invited single coworkers to her home for dinner.

We will not forget her.

Brenda Kegler

Brenda Kegler, 49, worked in the Pentagon as a budget analyst for the U.S. Army.

She had worked in the Pentagon for 30 years. Her husband, Bing, said she loved her job and enjoyed the company of her coworkers so much that even after he retired and moved to Florida, she stayed on at her job and Washington, D.C., home. "We were talking about her retiring and moving down to Florida with me," said Mr. Kegler, 63. "She was younger and loved her job, so it was harder for her to retire. But we were making plans. She was excited about us being together again, and so was I."

Survivors include two daughters.

We will not forget her.

Chandler "Chad" Keller

Chad Keller, 29, was a lead propulsion engineer and project manager with Boeing Satellite Systems in El Segundo, Ca. He was on board American Airlines Flight 77.

A graduate of the University of Colorado, he had worked for Hughes / Boeing for five years. He loved rocketry and space travel since he was a child. Technically astute, he had an ability to fix anything. He enjoyed surfing, skiing, snowboarding and cooking. He was loyal to his wife, family and friends.

Survivors include his wife Lisa; parents Kathy and Dick; and brothers Brandon and Gavin.

We will not forget him.

Yvonne Estelle O'Prey Kennedy

Yvonne Estelle O'Prey, 62, of Australia, was a passenger on board American Airlines flight 77, touring North America, Canada and the Arctic.

She and her husband, Barry Leigh Thomas Kennedy, had two sons, Leigh and Simon, started a business and traveled the world. After her husband died in 1985, she worked for the Australian Red Cross. She retired in 2000 but continued working as a volunteer and was awarded the Australian Red Cross Distinguished Service Medal in 2001. Last July, she was elected Executive Officer of the Corps, a position she would never have the opportunity to fulfill.

She was loved, respected and admired by all who knew her.

We will not forget her.

Norma Khan

Norma Khan was a passenger on board American Airlines flight 77.

She brought support, encouragement, hope and faith to her family. She loved her friends and touched the lives of many as a friend, a leader, a mentor and an energetic contributor to her community.

Survivors include her son Imran, 13.

We will not forget her.

Karen A. Kincaid

Karen A. Kincaid, 40, was a partner in the law firm Wiley Rein & Fielding and an adjunct professor at Catholic University's Columbus School of Law. She was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

She earned a B.A. from Central College and a J.D. from Drake University, both in Iowa. After serving as a senior attorney-advisor for the private radio bureau at the Federal Communications Commission, she joined Wiley Rein & Fielding in 1993. "She was one of the nicest, most genuine people you would hope to meet," said Richard Wiley, head of the firm.

Pastor Jim Donald of St. Columba's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., said, "She was a good attorney, self-effacing and brilliant in her work."

Survivors include her husband, Peter Batacan; brothers Kasey and the Rev. Kristian Kincaid; and sisters Kay D'Amico and Karyl Kincaid-Noel.

We will not forget her.

Michael Lamana

U.S. Navy Lt. Michael “Scott" Lamana, 31, monitored fleet operations in the Pentagon's Navy Command Center.

A graduate of Louisiana State University, he attended naval flight training school in Pensacola, Fla. He also took MBA courses at the University of West Florida and had been taking night classes at the University of Maryland in expectation of earning an MBA in December, 2001.

"He loved his job. He loved the military," said his father, Jay “Mike" Lamana. His wife Lorna said, "He was a good man, a good Navy man."

We will not forget him.

David Laychak

David Laychak, 40, was chief of the budget execution branch for the administrative assistant to the Secretary of the U.S. Army.

He graduated from Brown University and went to work for the Army. After attending the Army Comptroller Program and earning an MBA from Syracuse University, he became a budget analyst for the Army Signal Command at Fort Huachuca, Ariz. In 2000, he accepted the position of chief of the budget execution branch. He was selected for the Defense Leadership and Management Program.

He loved traveling and spending time with his family, taking nature walks and coaching kids. He also enjoyed sports, his friends, his country and his church. He believed in the fundamental values for which America stands.

Survivors include his wife Laurie and children Zachary and Jennifer.

We will not forget him.

D.C. Lee

D.C. Lee was a program manager in government information and communication systems in the space and communications group for the Boeing Company. He was a passenger on board American Airlines flight 77.

He came to the U.S. in 1968. A computer science graduate of the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University, he worked in the U.S. Air Force for four years and for the National Security Agency for 14 years.

He was always available to lend a hand, coach a team, listen to a friend and laugh at a joke. His life embodied the faith he held dear.

Survivors include his wife, Jungmi, and children Daniel, Melissa and Cynthia.

We will not forget him.

Kenneth and Jennifer Lewis

Kenneth and Jennifer Lewis were husband-and-wife flight attendants who were working on board American Airlines flight 77.

They became friends at a company Christmas party in 1991 and married two years later. Jennifer, 38, loved horses and practical jokes. "She'd bring a screwdriver to work and steal the handle off your baggage," recalled a colleague. Kenneth, 49, enjoyed playing golf. They both loved to travel, especially to Los Angeles, their favorite destination. They often persuaded his parents, Joanne and Eugene Lewis, to come with them. When they arrived, they wouldn't just shop or see the sights; even on a 24-hour layover they would drive eight hours to see Yosemite National Park or ride bikes along the beach.

We will not forget them.

Stephen V. Long

Maj. Stephen V. Long was secretary of the general staff for the U.S. Total Army Personnel Command.

He enlisted in the Army in 1981. Two years later he earned the Army Commendation Medal for Valor and the Purple Heart during Operation Urgent Fury in Grenada. He received a B.A. degree at Augusta State University in Georgia. In 1990 he was deployed as a platoon leader to Saudi Arabia during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. After serving as a company executive officer and logistics officer for the 82nd Airborne Division, he was assigned as a battalion logistics officer and later as a company commander with the 601st Aviation Support Battalion in Germany. In 1998 he was assigned to the U.S. Total Army Personnel Command.

His numerous awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Achievement Medal, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with Bronze Arrowhead and the Bronze Service Star.

He was a kind and generous man who loved God. He was dedicated to his wife and family. He honored his country.

Survivors include his wife, Tina Long, and stepsons David and Tryon Hopkins.

We will not forget him.

James T. Lynch, Jr.

James T. Lynch, Jr., 55, worked in the Navy Command Center as an electronics technician.

He joined the U.S. Air Force in 1967 and worked as a video technician at Keesler AFB, Miss. In 1969 he was assigned to the National Military Command Center at the Pentagon as an electronics technician. After his discharge in 1974 he returned to work as a civilian. He began working in the Navy Command Center in 1983.

He always flew an American flag from a 15-foot flagpole in his front yard. He loved feeding hummingbirds and growing roses. He also enjoyed taking pictures of his family. He was known for handing out candy in the Pentagon and elsewhere to anyone he felt needed a lift or a smile.

Survivors include his wife Brenda; son Paul; daughter Patty Singh; stepson John Jackson; mother Doris; four sisters and a brother.

We will not forget him.

Terence Michael Lynch

Terence M. Lynch, 49, was a Booz Allen Hamilton consultant who was attending a meeting at the Pentagon.

He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in history from Youngstown State University in Ohio. While working as an aide to Sen. Richard C. Shelby of Alabama from 1983 to 1995, he helped draft legislation establishing a National Institutes of Health research program on juvenile rheumatic diseases. He later worked for the Senate Intelligence and Veterans Affairs committees. He joined Booz Allen in 1999.

"He was extremely caring and gentle," said his wife, Jacqueline. "He was extremely modest, just a great guy."

Survivors include his wife and daughters Tiffany Marie and Ashley Nicole.

We will not forget him.

Nehamon Lyons IV

Nehamon Lyons IV, 30, worked as an operations specialist 2nd class in the Pentagon.

He attended the University of South Alabama in Mobile and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1997. He was first assigned to the USS Gettysburg and then transferred to the Pentagon in January, 2001.

He was a self-starter who worked tirelessly to achieve his goals. He had a broad smile for everyone.

Survivors include his mother Jewel, sister Sonya and brothers Rodney, Corey, Marquise and Christian.

We will not forget him.

Shelley Ann (Farr) Marshall

Shelley Ann Marshall, 37, was a senior management officer in the comptroller's office of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA).

She earned a B.S. from George Mason University and joined the DIA in 1987 as a human resources manager. In 1993, she took an administrative officer position in the counterdrug analysis office. In 1999 she became a senior management officer.

She enjoyed making scrapbooks and having tea parties. She was passionate about her work and her family. She was a devoted mother who read to her children every night.

Survivors include her husband Donn, son Drake, daughter Chandler, parents Mack and Nancy Farr and brothers Mark and Robert.

We will not forget her.

Teresa Marie Martin

Teresa “Teri" M. Martin was a partner in the family business, T.J. Martin Trucking.

She and her husband John planned to retire at 50. Two years ago they moved into her dream house, which had a wrap-around porch and sat on four acres. She kept a garden where she grew tomatoes for tomato sandwiches. She participated in activities at Choice Baptist Church, where she taught Sunday school and organized church dinners. “She was loved so much," said the Rev. Tim Wilcox.

We will not forget her.

Ada Wilson Mason

Ada Wilson Mason was a budget analyst for the U.S. Army.

She graduated from Jackson State University in 1973 and worked in banking until she began her career with the U.S. government in 1980.

She was strong-willed and analytical. As a member of Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Va., she sang in the choir and worked in the youth ministry and student tutorial ministry. Her Christian beliefs gave her strength. Her favorite flower was the lily, the symbol of grace and eternal life.

Survivors include her husband, Sherman L. Acker, Jr.; daughter Shannon; son Shaun; stepson Matthew Acker; three sisters and a brother; and her mother, Sareatha Wilson.

We will not forget her.

Dean Mattson

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Dean Mattson, 57, worked in the Pentagon.

His neighbors remembered he always had a smile and a friendly word. “He was just the very nicest, the very sweetest man," said one. He often brought gifts and treats for the staff during holidays. One neighbor said he was always in uniform or wearing jogging clothes. “He had a good spirit and a big heart," she said. "He was just an absolute sweetheart."

We will not forget him.

Timothy J. Maude

Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude, 53, worked in the Pentagon as the U.S. Army's deputy chief of staff for personnel.

He entered the Army in 1966 and served in a variety of command and staff positions during his 35-year career. He earned a B.A. degree from Golden Gate University and an M.A. from Ball State University. He also attended the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and the War College. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (with three Oak Leaf Clusters), Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal (with four Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Commendation Medal (with two Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Achievement Medal and the Army General Staff Identification Badge.

He loved soldiers; he loved the Army; he loved his country. His every action reflected his commitment to duty.

Survivors include his wife, Teri, and daughters Kathleen A. Koehler and Karen E. Maude.

We will not forget him.

Robert Maxwell

Robert Maxwell, 56, worked at the Pentagon as a civilian budget analyst for the U.S. Army.

He liked shrimp Creole and listening to Janis Joplin. His wife, Karen Greenberg, remembers how he brought stuffed Asian duck feet when she first invited him home to meet her father. "It took some thought," she said. “Anybody can bring flowers." She said he always gave her two cards for romantic occasions, "one ridiculous, one sincere."

Survivors include his wife and stepson, Tanner.

We will not forget him.

Renee A. May

Renee A. May, 39, was a flight attendant working on American Airlines flight 77.

She graduated from San Diego State University and had flown with American since 1986. She loved to travel and she loved art. She worked as a docent at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, near her home. She especially enjoyed giving museum tours to young visitors. "All children loved to be with her," said her fiancé, David Spivock. "She was the nicest person I ever met."

Survivors include her parents and brothers.

We will not forget her.

Molly L. McKenzie

Molly L. McKenzie, 38, was a civilian budget analyst for the U.S. Army.

She earned a B.S. degree from Mount Vernon Nazarene College and worked for the Army for 14 years. Her daughters Lea, 13, and Alana, 10, wrote that she "would do anything for us. She would take us places like shopping, the movies and places to eat. She loved to draw and read books. She liked to read the Bible. She liked to run and sometimes we ran with her. If we had a problem, she would always help us. She was not only our mother, she was our friend."

Survivors include her daughters; mother Elizabeth Hornberger; brothers Larry and Kenny; sisters Sally Wetzel and Judy Yake; and her former husband, Shane McKenzie.

We will not forget her.

Dora Menchaca

Dora Menchaca, 45, was a scientist for Amgen, a California biotechnology company, where she helped develop drugs to battle cancer and pneumonia. She had been meeting in Washington, D.C., with Food and Drug Administration regulators on the development of a new prostate cancer drug, and was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

Her husband, Earl Dorsey, remembers when they met in graduate school at UCLA, where she earned a doctorate in epidemiology. "I was attracted to her warmth and her great sense of humor," he said. A co-worker recalled how she "would visit schools and encourage the girls, especially the minorities, to pursue a career in science." Another co-worker said she was "intensely committed to saving patients' lives."

Survivors include her husband and children Imani and Jaryd.

We will not forget her.

Patricia Mickley

Patty Mickley, 41, worked for more than 19 years for the U.S. Department of Defense.

She graduated from Virginia Tech University. She was a nurturing mother, a loving daughter, a devoted spouse, a loyal sister, a caring aunt, a supportive friend and a dedicated professional. She held a deep belief in God, family and country. She always thought of others first. She believed in America.

Survivors include her husband Joseph, daughter Marie, parents Philip and Jacqueline, sisters Anne and Katherine and brother John.

We will not forget her.

Ronald Dutrell Milam

U.S. Army Maj. Ronald D. Milam, 33, worked in the Pentagon as the military assistant for the Secretary of Army, Manpower and Reserve Affairs.

He earned a B.A. degree from Eastern New Mexico University and served his country for 10 years as a platoon leader and executive officer in Germany, assistant operations officer and battery commander in Korea, and Patriot training officer for Saudi Arabian forces, before his assignment in the Pentagon. He was awarded the Legion of Merit, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Bronze Star, Cold War Certificate and Parachutist Badge.

Survivors include his wife, Jacqueline Fay; daughter Myejoi Olivia; parents Tommie and Effie; brother Steven and sister Stephanie.

We will not forget him.

Gerard P. Moran

Gerard P. “Jerry" Moran, 39, worked at the Pentagon as an engineering contractor for the U.S. Navy, doing video teleconferencing.

He studied photojournalism at the University of Oklahoma and traveled the world as a combat photographer for the Navy from 1979 to 1984. He was a humorist and a humanitarian. When not coaching softball, baseball or power lifting, he enjoyed cooking, relaxing at home with his family and trout fishing with his brother Kevin.

Survivors include his wife of 18 years, Joyce, a retired Navy photographer, and two children, Shannon and Dane.

We will not forget him.

Odessa V. Morris

Odessa V. Morris, 54, worked as a budget analyst in the Pentagon for the U.S. Army.

She attended Chesapeake Business College and worked for the federal government for 32 years. She gave of herself freely and volunteered as a financial counselor to others. She was treasurer and a member of the board of trustees of the New Mt. Olivet Apostolic Church. She loved cooking, sewing, photography and raising goats.

Survivors include her husband Tony; children Dahlia, Jan-Sheri and Keith; brothers Winford, Daniel and Joseph; and sisters Ethel and Rachel.

We will not forget her.

Brian Anthony Moss

U.S. Navy Petty Officer (2nd class) Brian A. Moss, 34, worked in the Pentagon as an electronics technician.

He attended Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College and worked as an accountant before enlisting in the Navy in 1990. He was stationed in Alaska and at Bolling Air Force Base before being transferred to the Pentagon in 2001. That year he was named Sailor of the Year for Naval District Washington. "I live by the Navy core values," he told Sea Services Weekly. "You can't talk the talk if you don't walk the walk."

Survivors include his wife MaryLou, children Ashton and Connor, parents Billie and Pat, and two siblings.

We will not forget him.

Teddington "Ted" Hamm Moy

Teddington “Ted" Hamm Moy, 48, worked at the Pentagon as a program manager in information management support for the U.S. Army.

He began working for the U.S. Navy in 1983. In 1999 he went to work for the Army at the Pentagon. "He was so patriotic," said his wife of 21 years, Madeline. On the Fourth of July he wore a red, white and blue sweat suit, complete with a floppy stars-and-stripes hat.

Survivors include his wife, son Daniel and daughter Jessica.

We will not forget him.

Patrick J. Murphy

U.S. Naval Reserve Lt. Cmdr. Patrick J. Murphy was serving a two-week assignment with the Navy Command Center in the Pentagon.

He earned a B.S. degree at the University of Mississippi and was commissioned an ensign in the U.S. Navy in 1986 in the nuclear propulsion program. He served on the USS Sand Lance. In 1991 he left active duty to pursue a career in chemical engineering. After earning an M.B.A degree from the University of Chicago he worked for the Naval Reserve and the Chief of Naval Operations. His decorations include the Navy Achievement Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal and the Purple Heart (posthumously awarded).

He was a student of history and a man of many interests. He enjoyed meeting people and learning different cultures. He believed strongly in family, God and country.

Survivors include his wife Masako; children Mitchell and Casey; mother Joan Miller; stepmother Joyce Murphy; brothers John Murphy and David J. Ames; stepbrother Rodger Miller and sisters Kathleen M. Schweikart, Susan G. Johns and Gwynne L. Murphy.

We will not forget him.

Khang Nguyen

Khang Nguyen, 41, worked at the Pentagon as a systems administrator for a U.S. Navy contractor.

He grew up amid war conditions in South Vietnam and immigrated to Washington, D.C. in 1981. After earning a B.S. degree from the University of Maryland, he worked for the Defense Information Systems Agency at the Pentagon for 13 years and had recently begun work as a systems administrator. He loved working at the Pentagon and would buy hats and T-shirts with government logos. He devoured books on the military, particularly about the Vietnam War. His family said he relished his new stable life.

Survivors include his wife Tu and son An.

We will not forget him.

Michael Allen Noeth

U.S. Navy Petty Officer (2d class) Michael Allen Noeth, 30, was working in the Pentagon as a Navy illustrator and draftsman.

He joined the Navy as a deck seaman in 1994. The next year he drew a cover for “All Hands," a Navy magazine where he worked. While stationed on the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp, he had a showing of his paintings in New York. "I paint sailors to show the world that we don't just ride ships to see some really cool foreign countries," he told the Navy News Service. "I want people to realize that their freedom and protection comes from the sweat of the sailors on board."

We will not forget him.

Barbara K. Olson

Barbara K. Olson, 45, an author, legal analyst and former federal prosecutor and congressional lawyer, was a passenger on board American Airlines flight 77. Before the plane was crashed into the Pentagon, she phoned her husband, U.S. Solicitor General Theodore Olson, and told him how terrorists had taken over the plane.

She graduated from Cardozo Law School in New York and became a prosecutor in the U.S. attorney's office in Washington. As chief investigative counsel for the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, she investigated the White House travel office firings. She also was the author of two books. She had recently joined the law firm Balch & Bingham.

She and her husband often invited congressional staffers and Supreme Court justices to their home. After the 2000 election, he argued the Florida election case before the U.S. Supreme Court while she advised the team representing President George W. Bush on the legalities of the absentee ballot count. She was "a smart and deliberate strategist," said David Bossie, a former colleague. "They had a really terrific relationship."

We will not forget her.

Ruben S. Ornedo

Ruben S. Ornedo was a lead engineer for Boeing Satellite Systems of El Segundo, Ca. He was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

He earned a degree in computer engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles. At work he was known as Ornedo the Tornado for his hard work and diligence. For more than 15 years at Hughes and Boeing, he played a key role in projects that were of vital importance to the defense and security of the nation.

He loved nature, the outdoors, world travel and home renovation. He was an easy-going man who was always concerned about others.

Survivors include his wife Sheila.

We will not forget him.

Diana B. Padro

Diana B. Padro worked in the Pentagon as an accountant for the office of the Secretary of the U.S. Army.

She earned a B.A. degree from Interamerican University of Puerto Rico. She joined the U.S Army and was stationed at Fort Hood, TX. After leaving the Army in 1982 she stayed involved with military life. She worked briefly for the National Guard. She loved her job and traveled often. Every time she visited a city, state or country, she brought home a magnet for her refrigerator door. At her office, she had a wall of similar items that friends brought from trips. She was an outgoing woman who immersed everyone in her laughter and energy.

Survivors include her husband Jose and sons José Javier and Juan Carlos.

We will not forget her.

Chin Sun Pak

U.S. Army Specialist Chin Sun Pak, 24, worked at the Pentagon as the administrative assistant to the deputy chief of staff for personnel.

Known to her family and friends as “Sunny," she joined the U.S. Army in 1998 and served a tour of duty in Korea. Her awards and decorations include the Joint Service Commendation Medal, Joint Service Achievement Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Army Overseas Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon and weapon Expert Qualification Badge. Her hobbies included gardening, photography and music. She planned to enter college to study medicine.

Survivors include her parents, Norman and Kum Wells, and brothers Chin Sok and Chin Yong Wells.

We will not forget her.

Jonas Martin Panik

Jonas M. Panik, 26, worked in the Pentagon as a flag intelligence briefer on the staff of the chief of naval operations intelligence plot (CNO-IP).

He earned a B.S. degree from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1997 and was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve. After working briefly in the Office of Naval Intelligence, he was assigned to Patrol Squadron 46 in Whidbey Island, WA., where he was deployed to the western Pacific and the Arabian Gulf. He was then assigned to CNO-IP.

His awards include the Navy/Marine Corps Achievement Medal, the National Defense Medal and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. He loved medieval history, sports and travel. He was an outstanding officer who cared for his people, his job and his country.

Survivors include his wife Jennifer; his parents, Martin and Linda, and his sister Martina.

We will not forget him.

Clifford L. Patterson, Jr.

U.S. Army Maj. Clifford L. Patterson, Jr., worked in the Pentagon as budget officer for the Resource Management division.

He was a Distinguished Military Graduate from Howard University in 1991 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the infantry. His assignments included Bradley platoon leader, Scout platoon leader and company executive officer for 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, and Battalion S-4 for 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry; commander, Charlie and Headquarters companies, 1-502nd Infantry Regiment, Fort Campbell, KY. His awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Army Staff Badge, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, Southwest Asia Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Expert Infantryman Badge, Pathfinder Badge and Parachutist and Air Assault badges.

Survivors include his wife, Capt. (P) Tarnatha Patterson, and sons Clifford and Benjamin.

We will not forget him.

Robert Penniger

Robert Penniger lived life to the fullest. He enjoyed motorcycle trips with his wife and friends and attending car shows where he won trophies showing his 1999 Cobra Mustang.

He will be greatly missed by those whose lives he touched.

We will not forget him.

Robert R. Ploger III

Robert Riis Ploger III, 59, was director of enterprise engineering at Lockheed Martin. He was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, leaving for his honeymoon with Zandra Cooper Ploger.

He served in the U.S. Army from 1960-1962 and graduated from the University of Denver in 1965. He helped develop the ARPANET. He retired from IBM in 1996 with two patents. He was a skilled woodworker and enjoyed playing tennis and fixing things. His friends and family will miss his intensity, sense of humor, and sharp mind.

Survivors include two children, Wendy Ploger Chamberlain and Robert Riis Ploger IV; father Maj. Gen. Robert R. Ploger, USA (ret.); brothers Wayne, Daniel and Gregory; sisters Marianne Ploger Hill and Marguerite Ploger; and first wife Sheila Wagner Ploger.

We will not forget him.

Zandra Cooper Ploger

Zandra Cooper Ploger, 48, was a manager at IBM for more than 20 years. She was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, on a honeymoon with Robert Riis Ploger III.

She was a consummate party organizer and hostess. She loved reading mystery novels and collecting porcelain figurines. She and her new husband were married on a pontoon boat and had four grown children between them. His nickname for her was "Pretty," her nickname for him was "Love." They played tennis together and were "Star Trek" fans.

We will not forget her.

Darin Howard Pontell

U.S. Navy Lt. Darin H. Pontell, 26, worked in the Pentagon.

Upon graduation from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1998 as an intelligence officer, he reported to the Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Command in Dam Neck, Va. He was assigned to Carrier Air Wing Seven as the Collections Officer. He was later deployed to the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. He received the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Naval Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal and National Defense Service Medal. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart Medal.

"He was thoughtful and generous and wanted to make everyone around him happy," said his wife, Devora Sue Wolk. " He would do whatever it took to make his family and friends smile."

We will not forget him.

Scott Powell

Scott Powell, 35, worked at the Pentagon as a civilian contractor for BTG Inc.

He was a classically trained son of a dancer and a musician. A father of three, he played bass, acoustic guitar and keyboard and incorporated thousands of computer-generated sounds into his music. He and his twin brother Art played rhythm and blues, pop and jazz, and traditional Somali and Arabic songs while on tour in Sweden and the U.K. with a group called Shego Band. They started a production company called Dem Twinzz Productions. He also was a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, which led to his job at the Pentagon.

His family is setting up a scholarship fund at Washington's Duke Ellington School of the Arts, which he attended.

We will not forget him.

Jack D. Punches

U.S. Navy Capt. (Ret.) Jack Punches worked in the Pentagon as deputy head, Navy Interagency Support Branch.

He earned a B.S. degree from Missouri University, an M.S. from the Naval War College and an M.S. from Salve Regina in International Relations. Designated a Naval aviator in 1975, he was assigned to NAS Jacksonville, Fl. After three deployments he served as an instructor pilot. In 1982, he reported to VPU-1 (Special Projects) in Brunswick, Me. After two years of intelligence duties, he reported to the Navy War College. After graduation, he served as a maintenance officer. He joined the Fleet Logistics Support Squadron in Sicily as the executive officer in 1989. He assumed command of VR-24 in 1991 and deployed to Saudi Arabia in support of Operations Desert Storm/ Desert Shield. In 1992, he reported to United Command as chief, airborne operations. In 1995, he became head of Navy Counterdrug in the office of Chief of Naval Operations and special assistant to the Under Secretary of the Navy. In 1996, he served as deputy director, Operations and Interagency Support division. He retired in 2000 and worked for Blue Stone Consulting of Alexandria, Va. Later that year he returned to the Navy as a senior civilian employee at the Navy Interagency Support Branch.

His awards include Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, two Meritorious Service Medals, Navy Achievement, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Navy Unit Commendation. He enjoyed playing golf with his son and helping his daughter set up her first apartment.

Survivors include his wife Janice; children Jennifer and Jeremy; mother Ruth Godwin and father Jack; sisters Shirley, Janet, Ilena and Debbie; grandfather Floyd.

We will not forget him.

Joseph John Pycior, Jr.

Joseph J. Pycior, Jr., 39, worked in the Pentagon as an aviation warfare systems operator first class.

He had always wanted to be in the Navy. He served on several ships, including the USS George Washington and USS Seattle. During Operation Desert Storm, he was in the Persian Gulf. In 1999 he was assigned to the Pentagon.

He was a Cub Scout den leader and enjoyed taking his sons camping and fishing. “He's happy, outgoing, funny," said his wife Terri. “He loves children. Everyone that he works with loves him. And he's the perfect dad and husband."

Survivors include his wife, sons Joseph John III and Robert Adam, and his parents, Arlene and Joseph.

We will not forget him.

Lisa J. Raines

Lisa J. Raines, 42, was senior vice president of government relations at Genzyme Corp., a Boston biotechnology company.

She had worked in Washington, D.C., for years on health-care issues. She was a key figure in negotiating legislative compromises in several drug and health-care disputes, including a 1997 bill that modernized the Food and Drug Administration. She championed “fast track" legislation that permitted the FDA to grant speedier access to new drugs. Recently she had worked to get her industry to support the idea of Medicare drug coverage for the elderly.

Survivors include her husband, Steve Push, head of investor and media relations for IGEN International Inc.

We will not forget her.

Deborah Ann Ramsaur

Deborah A. Ramsaur worked in the Pentagon as the secretary to the U.S. deputy chief of staff for personnel.

She loved her job and loved being a member of the Department of Defense. On weekends she proudly wore an Army T-shirt that read “hooah!", a word associated with soldiers. She always had time for her children, taking them to the park, to soccer games and to swimming lessons.

Survivors include her husband John; children Ann and Brian; mother Joyce LaRoche, and brothers Ernest and David.

We will not forget her.

Rhonda Sue Ridge Rasmussen

Rhonda Sue Ridge Rasmussen, 44, worked in the Pentagon as a budget analyst for the U.S. Army.

She and her husband Floyd, who also worked for the Army in the Pentagon but was able to evacuate safely, traveled the world during their combined 51 years of service. She particularly enjoyed their three stints in Germany, but her favorite place, said her husband, "was wherever she happened to be with me and me with her." He said she was "big of heart, big smile, willing to listen, laugh at you, put you at ease."

Survivors include her husband; children Nathan, Jeremiah, Thaddaus and Rebekkah; stepchildren Michael, Lisa and Shawn; her mother and three brothers.

We will not forget her.

Marsha D. Ratchford

Marsha D. Ratchford, 34, worked at the Pentagon as an information technician for the U.S. Navy.

She joined the Navy about 15 years ago. She was a friendly, quiet woman who had many loves in her life, including working with computers and the challenge of handling crucial military messages at the Navy Command Center in the Pentagon. But few equaled her devotion as a mother. "She was a mother from her heart," said her husband Rodney.

Survivors include her husband, a son and two daughters.

We will not forget her.

Martha Reszke

Martha Reszke, 56, worked for the U.S. Army budget office in the Pentagon.

She was dedicated to her job, where she had worked for eight years, and she was a dedicated mother, wife and friend. To “everyone who came into her life, she gave," said her husband Jim. “She was genuinely kind, honest." Her home featured a series of plant and flower beds bordered by a brick wall. “She was everybody's gardener," he added. “Her therapy after work was (her) garden. She told you how it should be, and you did it. She was the designer. I was the digger."

We will not forget her.

Todd Hayes Reuben

Todd H. Reuben, 40, was a corporate partner at the Washington, D.C., law firm of Venable, Baetjer and Howard. He was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

He graduated from Emory University and worked as a certified public accountant for three years. After graduating with honors from George Washington University's National Law Center, he worked for the law firm of Tucker Flyer, which joined Venable in 2000. He specialized in tax and business transactions and was dedicated to the practice of law and outstanding in his field.

His passions in life were his family and sports. He was a fan of all Washington sports teams, and he loved coaching his twin sons in basketball and soccer.

Survivors include his wife Vivian; sons Jason and Jeffrey; parents S. Jesse and Carole; brother Keith and sister Stacey Mesa.

We will not forget him.

Cecelia E. Richard

Cecelia E. Richard, 41, worked in the Pentagon as an accounting technician for the U.S. Army. She had worked for the Defense department since graduating from high school.

She spent her free time listening to jazz, going on family trips and attending church. Her husband Michael said she "was always considerate of her family." She also had a passion for the Washington Redskins football team and her pet Labrador.

Survivors include her husband, three sisters and three brothers, and her mother Mazie.

We will not forget her.

Edward Veld Rowenhorst

Edward Rowenhorst, 32, worked as a civilian accountant for the U.S. Army in the Pentagon.

He graduated from George Mason University in 1992 and went to work at the Pentagon, where he had interned while in college. He loved to take his daughter Ashley, 7, to his office, whether it was for Take Our Daughters to Work Day or just to give his wife a break at home. "Everyone in the office enjoyed kids," said his wife, Traci. "They were just a big family there."

Survivors include his wife and daughters Ashley and Kaitlyn.

We will not forget him.

Judy Rowlett

Judy Rowlett entered the federal service in 1986. She worked in a wide variety of positions prior to beginning work as a transportation assistant with the Defense Resources Activity Washington. Her coworkers widely respected her specialized organizational skills and attention to detail.

Friends and family remember her as a kind and loving person who especially enjoyed spending time with them. Co-workers speak of her resilience, her ability to live life to its fullest, and the example she set for them to do the same. She showed all who knew her how to rise to their full potential.

She is survived by her mother and her daughters Trisha and Sicely.

We will not forget her.

Robert E. Russell

Robert E. Russell, 52, worked in the Pentagon as a supervisory budget analyst.

He spent 23 years in the U.S. Army, serving two tours in Germany, one in Korea and one in Belgium. After retiring from active duty in 1993, he worked as a civilian budget analyst. He had a calm, analytical personality. He was a source of comfort and counsel to his friends and relatives, and he had great culinary skills. He was a loving and generous grandfather, father, husband, brother and friend.

Survivors include his wife Teresa, three grown children and his mother Mildred Fletcher.

We will not forget him.

William Ruth

William Ruth, 57, was a U.S. Army chief warrant officer who worked in the Pentagon.

He was a veteran of the Vietnam war, where he served in the Marines as a helicopter pilot, and the Gulf war, where he served in the Army Reserve. He earned a master's degree and taught social studies for nearly 30 years. A voracious reader and caring mentor, he took his students on field trips and helped younger teachers. In 1997, he retired from teaching and went to work for the Army at the Pentagon. Last Sept. 10, he presided over his first meeting as commander of his local VFW post, where he was remembered as a good friend, an avid football fan and an enthusiastic motorcyclist. "He'd do anything for anybody," said a friend.

Survivors include his companion Darlene Claypool and his son, Sean.

We will not forget him.

Charles (Chuck) Edward Sabin

Charles (Chuck) E. Sabin, 54, was the senior financial resources expert for the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA).

He earned a B.S. degree from Drexel Institute of Technology in 1969 and worked as an accountant with the U.S. Army Audit Agency. Commissioned in 1970, he served with the Army in Belgium and Holland and the U.S. He earned an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University and an Army Commander's Award for Civilian Service. After joining DIA in 1981 as an accountant he received Director's Awards for Meritorious Service in 1984 and Exceptional Service in 1991. His leadership and incisive analysis led DIA's financial policy and accounting office through major organizational changes. He loved life and had many friends. He also personally mentored many DIA employees.

Survivors include sons Charles Jr. and Paul, and brothers Martin and Frederick.

We will not forget him.

Marjorie Champion Salamone

Marjorie C. Salamone, 53, worked at the Pentagon as a U.S. Army budget analyst.

She earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Auburn University. She was always happy to help others. When a neighbor's basement flooded, she found the water main and turned it off. After a freeze, she helped neighbors relight gas pilot lights. She had a quick wit, a delightful sense of humor and a deep faith in God. She was an inspiration to all who knew her.

Survivors include her husband of 31 years, Ben, a retired Army colonel and veterinarian; daughters Amanda and Ann Marie; and her mother, Lillian Champion.

We will not forget her.

John P. Sammartino

John P. Sammartino, 37, an engineer at XonTech Inc., was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

He studied at George Washington University and earned a master's degree at Johns Hopkins University. He worked as an engineer at the Naval Research Lab and then worked 11 years at XonTech, a Rosslyn, Va., defense-related research and development firm. He enjoyed woodworking and, with his father, carved the window frames and cabinets of his home.

Survivors include his wife, Deborah Rooney; daughter Nicole; parents Ann and Frank, and a sister.

We will not forget him.

David M. Scales

U.S. Army Reserve Col. David M. Scales, 44, worked in the Pentagon as the personnel policy integrator for the deputy chief of staff for personnel.

He earned a BA degree from the University of Cincinnati and an MBA from Southern Illinois University. Commissioned in 1978, he served in Ohio before going to South Korea in 1979 as an ambulance platoon leader. He later served in Colorado, Missouri and Virginia. At the Pentagon he focused on initiatives affecting the readiness of the Army Reserve. He was “an extremely professional, dedicated officer," said a colleague. His wife Patricia called him "a loving, faithful husband and a dedicated father who always found the silver lining in every dark cloud." He was a talented pianist.

Survivors include his wife and son Ashton.

We will not forget him.

Robert Allan Schlegel

U.S. Navy Cmdr. Robert A. Schlegel, who carried on a long naval tradition in his family, worked in the Pentagon as deputy current operations and plans branch head for the chief of naval operations.

He graduated from Washington and Lee University and earned an MA from Old Dominion University and a Naval War College diploma. He served on the USS Spartanburg County and the USS Harry E. Yarnell and then as an instructor at Fleet Combat Training Center Atlantic. After serving on the USS Scott, he was assigned as the officer-in-charge of the Tomahawk Afloat Planning System and the Tomahawk action officer. He served as executive officer aboard the USS Arthur W. Radford. In 2000 he was selected for afloat command and promoted to commander in 2001.

His awards include the Purple Heart, a Meritorious Service Medal, four Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, a Meritorious Unit Commendation, a National Defense Service Medal, an Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Armed Forces Service Medal, five Sea Service Deployment Ribbons and a NATO Medal.

Survivors include his wife, Dr. Dawn Marie Schlegel.

We will not forget him.

Janice Marie Scott

Janice M. Scott, 46, worked in the Pentagon as a budget officer for Resource Services Washington.

She earned an associate degree from Enterprise (Ala.) State Junior College and a BS degree from the University of Maryland. In 1987 she joined the U.S. Army Personnel Command as an assistant budget officer. In 1989 she became a budget officer with Resource Services Washington and in 2001 was promoted to team leader.

She was a member of Blacks in Government, 5-Star Toastmasters Club, Assn. of Government Accountants and Jack and Jill of America, Inc., where she was chapter historian, program director and vice president. She was a member of Greater Little Zion Baptist Church.

Survivors include her husband Abraham and daughters Crystal and Angel.

We will not forget her.

Michael L. Selves

Michael L. Selves, 53, was director of the U.S. Army's information management support center at the Pentagon.

He was a graduate of the University of Oregon. During a 20-year Army career, he served in South Korea and Italy, advancing to the rank of lieutenant colonel. In 1996, as a civilian, he became director of the center.

An avid golfer, he was known for his sense of humor. He once livened up a speech by stripping down to his undershirt and a bathing suit. He developed close friendships wherever he went. His wife Gayle said he "could make just about anyone laugh."

We will not forget him.

Marian Serva

Marian Serva, 47, worked in the Pentagon as a congressional affairs contact officer for the U.S. Army. She had worked at the Pentagon for 15 years.

She enjoyed growing tomatoes, flowers and exotic shrubs at her home, and traveling the world with her husband of 26 years, Bruce, who was retired from the Army. "We worked as a team every single day," he said. "She was my best friend."

Survivors include her husband and daughter Christina.

We will not forget her.

Daniel F. Shanower

U.S. Navy Cmdr. Daniel F. Shanower, 40, worked in the Navy Command Center in the Pentagon.

He graduated from Carroll College in 1983 and began naval officer training in Florida. During his 15 years in the service, his assignments included Japan, the Philippines and, for several tours, the aircraft carrier USS Midway. But, said his brother Jonathan, “he loved being in Washington." He had been studying for a master's degree at Georgetown University.

We will not forget him.

Antionette Sherman

Antionette Sherman, 35, worked in the Pentagon for the U.S. Army.

She enjoyed taking care of her dogs, Oreo and Rex, and had been looking forward to an upcoming cruise.

Survivors include her parents, Eloise and Charles Clark, and her foster son.

We will not forget her.

Diane M. Simmons

Diane M. Simmons, a retired sales representative of Xerox Corp., was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77 along with her husband George.

She enjoyed traveling with her husband of 19 years, spending time with family and friends, and volunteering her services to help the needy. She also loved to cook and was referred to as "Chez Nana."

Survivors include her sons Kevin and Brian Long; step-children George, Deanna and Christopher Simmons; her brother Fred Helm and sister Tricia Ficarella.

We will not forget her.

George W. Simmons

George W. Simmons, a retired sales training manager for Xerox Corp., was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77 along with his wife Diane.

He worked for 32 years at Xerox and enjoyed playing golf and traveling, sending postcards from all over the world, and living life to its fullest. He was a member of the No Bats Baseball Club.

Survivors include his sons George and Christopher; daughter Deanna; step-sons Kevin and Brian Long, and brothers Jeff Simmons and Michael Finneran.

We will not forget him.

Don Simmons

Don Simmons, 58, worked in the Pentagon for the U.S. Army.

He served in the Army from 1964 to 1966 and was an avid fisherman, inventor and artist who loved to paint mountains and scenery. He was interested in Republican politics and was a patriot. He also enjoyed spontaneous excursions with his wife Peggy to county fairs, craft shows, the ocean, the mountains, and visiting antique shops. He was devoted, compassionate, supportive and loving.

We will not forget him.

Cheryle D. Sincock

Cheryle D. Sincock was a 15-year government employee who worked in the Pentagon.

She was dedicated to her job and to her family, and was looking forward to celebrating her 25th anniversary with her husband in Las Vegas. She was loved by all who knew her for her many kind acts.

Survivors include her husband, Chief Warrant Officer Craig W. Sincock, and four children.

We will not forget her.

Gregg H. Smallwood

U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer Gregg H. Smallwood worked in the Pentagon in the Office of the Chief Information Systems Technician.

During his 19 years in the Navy, he served in Guam and Diego Garcia; in Texas and California, and on the USS Henry B. Wilson, USS Harry W. Hill and USS Reasoner. He also worked for the Chief of Naval Operations. His decorations include Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (3), Navy Unit Commendation, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (3), Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (2), Good Conduct Medal (3), Kuwait Liberation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Overseas Ribbon, National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Navy “E" Award.

Survivors include his wife Lisa; daughters Wendy, Lynn and Valerie; parents Harold and Florence, and sister Dr. Laura J. Smallwood.

We will not forget him.

Gary F. Smith

Gary F. Smith worked in the Pentagon as chief of Army retirement services.

He earned a BA degree from Creighton University and an MS from the University of Southern California. His first command assignment was in 1968 as company commander/platoon leader with the 560th Signal Battalion in Italy. Later, he was aide-de-camp and training officer at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.; executive officer and adjutant at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks in Kansas; equal opportunity officer in Washington, and G-1 and adjutant general with Allied Forces Central Europe Reserve Corps in The Netherlands. In 1984, he worked for the Army's deputy chief of staff for personnel, alcohol and drug policy, and later was deputy chief of staff for personnel, administration and logistics at the U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center in Virginia. He retired in 1991 as director of the center.

His decorations include Soldier's Medal, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Army General Staff Identification Badge and Parachute Badge.

Survivors include his wife Ann and four daughters.

We will not forget him.

Mari-Rae Sopper

Mari-Rae Sopper, 35, a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, was on her way to the University of California at Santa Barbara, where she was the new women's gymnastics coach.

A gifted gymnast, she graduated from Iowa State University and earned a law degree from the University of Denver. In 1996, she moved to Washington, where she joined the Navy Judge Advocate General's Corps. She later worked for Schmeltzer Aptaker & Shepard, a law firm, and as an assistant gymnastics coach and choreographer at George Washington University. "One thing she taught me is, you never settle for less than you're capable of," recalled her high school gymnastics coach.

We will not forget her.

Patricia Statz

Patricia Statz, 41, worked in the Pentagon for the U.S. Army.

After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, she worked as an actress and director at U.S. Army base theaters in Germany and traveled extensively in Europe. She later earned a master's degree. She was pursuing a doctorate in education and was working to improve education for children with special needs.

Survivors include her husband, David Carroll; sons Daniel and Erick; parents Vincent and JoAnn; sisters Elizabeth Erickson, Nancy Leon, Diane Brostrom, Renee Sreenivasam, Barbara Krause, and Catherine, Sandra, Jacqueline and Pamela Statz; and brothers Timothy, Charles and Phillip.

We will not forget her.

Edna Lee Stephens

Edna Lee Stephens, 53, worked in the Pentagon as a budget analyst.

She worked for the U.S. Army and the Department of Defense for 34 years, and was taking courses at the University of the District of Columbia and at Ft. Benjamin Harrison in Indiana. She was a member of the Varick Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church. She loved her family, her church and her friends.

Survivors include her son, Torrass Martez Allen; her father, the Rev. Eddie Stephens; sisters Betty Hill, Brenda Pyant, Gloria Darrisaw, Mary Stephens, Eunice Holcomb and Barbara Cobb, and brothers Eddie and Marvin.

We will not forget her.

Norma Lang Steuerle

Norma L. Steuerle, 54, a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, was a clinical psychologist.

A valedictorian at Carnegie Mellon University, she earned an M.A. degree from Temple University and a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin. She was known for her community service, particularly in the Blessed Sacrament Catholic community and her daughters' schools. She was "a very wise woman," said a school director. “She had that extraordinary ability to make (a person) feel immediately comfortable, like an old friend."

Survivors include her husband, C. Eugene, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, and daughters Kristin and Lynne.

We will not forget her.

Larry Lee Strickland

U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Larry L. Strickland, 52, was the senior enlisted advisor to the deputy chief of staff for personnel.

He earned a B.S. degree from Regents College in New York and enlisted in the Army in 1972. He served in a variety of personnel administration assignments in the U.S. and Europe over his 29-year career. His duties in the Pentagon included providing advice on plans, policies and program changes that had potential impact on the enlisted force.

His awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal (4), Army Commendation Medal (2), Army Achievement medal, Army General Staff Identification badge, Good Conduct Medal (9), National Defense Service Medal with Bronze Star, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development medal (4), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (3) and Army Superior Unit award (2).

Survivors include his wife, Command Sgt. Maj. Debra Strickland; children Julia Dill, Matthew and Christopher; parents Lee and Olga, and sister Donna McBride.

We will not forget him.

Hilda E. Taylor

Hilda E. Taylor, a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, was a sixth-grade teacher at M.V. Leckie Elementary School in Washington, D.C.. She was accompanying students on a National Geographic field trip.

Born in Sierra Leone, she earned an M.A. degree from the University of the District of Columbia. She loved teaching and developing young minds. She was a seasoned traveler and an accomplished cook who also enjoyed gardening and playing with her grandson.

Survivors include sons Donald and Dennis Stafford, daughter Octavia, and a brother.

We will not forget her.

Kip P. Taylor

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Kip P. Taylor worked in the Pentagon as the military assistant to the deputy chief of staff for personnel.

He was commissioned at Northern Michigan University in 1985 by his father, Lt. Col. Donald R. Taylor. He earned a B.S. degree there and an M.A. degree at the Naval War College in Rhode Island. His assignments included executive officer to the U.S. Army Regional Personnel Center in Germany; doctrine and curriculum developer at Ft. Ben Harrison, Indiana Army Personnel School; and adjutant and personnel detachment commander of a special operations unit at Fort Bragg, N.C.

Survivors include his wife and son.

We will not forget him.

Leonard E. Taylor

Leonard (Lenny) E. Taylor, 44, a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, was a technical group manager for XonTech, Inc.

He earned a B.S. degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1979 and played semipro hockey and coached youth hockey. He often rode his bike 20 miles to work and participated in bike races and tours for local charities. He was dedicated to his family and took great pride in his daughters.

Survivors include his wife Karyn; daughters Jessica and Colette; parents Mary and Raymond; sisters Ann and Barbara, and brothers Gregory and Jeffery.

We will not forget him.

Sandra Carol Taylor

Sandra Carol Taylor, 50, worked at the Pentagon for 9 years during a nearly three-decade-long career of government service.

Her fiancé, Timothy Dudgeon, said she was "a child of the sixties, a lover of family, a lover of friends, and a lover of the less fortunate." She worked as a volunteer at the Women's Center in Vienna, Va., and at the Hospice of Northern Virginia. Her main focus in life was her daughter, for whom she was a constant cheerleader, best friend and supportive mother.

Survivors include her daughter Samantha and brother Wayne Fraser.

We will not forget her.

Sandra D. Teague

Sandra D. Teague, 31, a passenger on American Airlines flight 77, was a physical therapist at Georgetown University Hospital.

She earned a master's degree from the University of Osteopathic Medicine and Health Sciences and was described by friends as a warm, witty, vivacious and athletic woman. At work she was considered “an excellent clinician and a rising star," said the director of physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Survivors include her parents Elaine and James, sister Jennifer and brother Chris.

We will not forget her.

Karl William Teepe

Karl W. Teepe, 57, worked for the Defense Intelligence Agency as a financial resources manager.

He earned a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois and a master's degree from the University of Missouri. He was a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. During 22 years in the U.S. Army, he served in Germany and South Korea. His decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal with four oak leaf clusters; Army Commendation Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Bronze Service Star; Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal; Army Service Ribbon and Overseas Service Ribbon. He retired from the Army as a lieutenant colonel in 1991 after 22 years of service.

His family was the most important thing in his life. He also enjoyed visiting the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Survivors include his wife Donna; son Adam; daughter Wendy Green; mother Ruth, and brother Kenneth.

We will not forget him.

Tamara Thurman

U.S. Army Sgt. Tamara Thurman, 25, worked in the Pentagon as an assistant in the office of the deputy chief of staff for personnel.

She enlisted out of high school and served in Bosnia, Korea and Germany. She was awarded the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal and Army Good Conduct Medal. She loved basketball and music. Her mother, Saundra Woolen, described her as "a sweet girl" and said, "I am very proud of her."

We will not forget her.

Otis V. Tolbert

U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Otis V. Tolbert, 38, wrote intelligence briefings for the chief of naval operations in the Pentagon.

He played football while attending California State University, Fresno, and was a fan of the Oakland Raiders football team. Less than a month after he was married, he and his wife Shari moved to Guam after he was deployed during the Persian Gulf War. “These guys are heroes every day," she said. “It's not just when a plane hits their building."

Survivors include his wife, daughters Brittany and Amanda, and son Anthony.

We will not forget him.

Willie Q. Troy

Willie Q. Troy, 51, worked in the Pentagon as an analyst.

He entered the U.S. Army in 1970 and served in Vietnam as a guard to Gen. Creighton Abrams. Although wounded during his tour, he stayed until his assignment was completed. Later assignments took him to New Mexico, Washington, D.C., Panama and Fort Bragg, N.C. As a result of his injury, he retired after 15 years. He later lived in Germany, Panama and Puerto Rico. While there, he completed requirements for a degree from Stewart University.

He enjoyed traveling and cooking for his family. He bought a house for his mother and loved fishing with his brother. He left an impression on everyone he met.

Survivors include his wife Judy, daughter ReNee, and mother Bessie Mae.

We will not forget him.

Ronald James Vauk

Lt. Cmdr. Ronald J. Vauk was assigned to the Naval Command Center on his annual two-week Navy Reserve stint at the Pentagon.

He attended the U.S. Naval Academy and spent five years in the Navy before joining the reserves. He worked at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in research. One of his sisters described him as a “fabulous human being."

Survivors include his wife and a son.

We will not forget him.

Karen J. Wagner

U.S. Army Lt. Col. Karen J. Wagner, 40, was the medical personnel officer in the office of the Army surgeon general and deputy chief of staff for personnel.

She graduated from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and earned a master's degree from Webster University. During 17 years of service, her postings included adjutant for the 85th Medical Evacuation Hospital in Virginia.; executive officer and company commander in the 187th Medical Battalion in Texas and chief of personnel for the 57th Evacuation Hospital in Germany. She also headed the personnel services branch at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington.

She enjoyed cooking and running.

We will not forget her.

Meta Waller

Meta Waller, 60, worked in the Pentagon as special programs manager for the administrative assistant to the Army secretary.

She earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan and a master's from Harvard. She had an interest in the civil rights movement and was inspired by her grandparents, Meta Warrick Fuller, a sculptor, and Solomon Carter Fuller, the first African American psychiatrist in the U.S. She was a poet, a storyteller and a world traveler.

We will not forget her.

Maudlyn White

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Maudlyn White, 38, worked in the Pentagon.

She was a quiet, independent person. "She likes to do things her own way, and that's why she joined the Army," said her stepfather, Richard Irish.

Survivors include a daughter and four brothers and sisters.

We will not forget her.

Sandra Letitia White

Sandra L. (Murray) White, 44, worked as a budget analyst in the Pentagon for the U.S. Army.

A graduate of Hampton Roads Business College, she worked for the Army for 15 years in budgeting and accounting. She was a lover of God's word and a devoted Christian wife, mother and best friend.

Survivors include her husband of 18 years, Col. (Ret.) Oscar N. White, Jr.; sons Oscar III and Jonathan; parents Aaron and Gloria Murray; brothers Curtis and Aaron Murray, and sisters Maj. Gloria Murray and Connie Harris.

We will not forget her.

Ernest M. Willcher

Ernest M. Willcher, 62, was a consultant who was briefing the U.S. Army's deputy chief of staff for personnel on an improved system for survivor benefits for military employees when terrorists struck the Pentagon.

He joined Booz, Allen & Hamilton consultants in 2001 after 25 years as a civilian employee at the Pentagon. A graduate of the University of Maryland, he also earned a law degree from American University. He served in the U.S. Army for three years and spent 37 years as a civilian employee. “He was self-motivated and determined," said Shirley, his wife of 23 years. “He always said he was working for the right client: the citizens of the country."

Survivors include his wife, and sons Benjamin and Joel.

We will not forget him.

Dave Williams

U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Dave Williams worked in the Pentagon as an action officer for the chief of naval operations.

He earned a B.A. degree from Virginia Military Institute and an M.A. from the Naval Postgraduate School. He also attended Surface Warfare Officer's school and Surface Warfare Department Head school. While serving aboard USS Gunston Hall he completed two Mediterranean deployments. He later served as operations officer aboard USS Whidbey Island, during deployment to the Caribbean and South America, and aboard USS Nashville, in the Mediterranean and near Puerto Rico.

His awards include the Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (2) and Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

Survivors include his wife Sara and daughters Sophie and Meredith.

We will not forget him.

Dwayne Williams

U.S. Army Maj. Dwayne Williams worked in the Pentagon as joint officer distribution manager under the director for military personnel management.

His military education included the Basic Airborne Course, Jungle Warfare and Ranger schools, Adjutant General's Corps officer courses, Combined Arms and Services Staff school and Army Command and General Staff College. He mentored young officers and loved his job, his Army and his country.

His awards and decorations include Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (2), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal (3), Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal (3), Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal with two stars, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, Joint Meritorious Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Kuwait Liberation Medal, Ranger Tab and Parachute Badge.

Survivors include his wife Tammy and children Tyler and Kelsie.

We will not forget him.

Marvin Roger Woods

Marvin Roger Woods, 57, worked in the Pentagon as a director of communications for the U.S. Navy.

Known to his friends as Roger, he enlisted in the Navy when he was in high school and served 23 years, including tours in Vietnam and Puerto Rico. After he retired in 1984, he continued working in his job as a civilian. "My husband was proud of the 40 years he gave to his country," said his wife Betty. "His job was his life," said his son James.

He enjoyed hunting with his brother and fishing in his boat.

Survivors include his wife and three children.

We will not forget him.

John D. Yamnicky

Retired U.S. Navy Capt. John D. Yamnicky, Sr., 71, a program manager for Veridian Corp., was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he flew combat missions during the Vietnam war. His fellow aviators called him an “exceptional fighter pilot who you wanted on your team when the chips were down." He became director of the Navy Test Pilot School in 1972. “He was just a magnificent man," said Lt. Cmdr. (ret.) Harry Errington. “He ranks among the top Americans I know because of his lifestyle, his values, the way he cared about people, and his obvious pride for the Navy and for his country."

He was active in the Elks Lodge youth program in southern Maryland and served on the board of directors of St. Mary's Ryken High School. A past grand knight of the Knights of Columbus, he worshiped at St. Peter's Catholic Church and was a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots.

Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Jann.

We will not forget him.

Vicki Yancey

Vicki Yancey, 43, a former naval electronics technician who worked for Vredenburg, a defense contractor, was a passenger on American Airlines flight 77.

She was an eager worker and an even more eager traveler. She loved politics, figure skating and going to the beach. She once wrote a letter to The Washington Post lamenting the demise of the one-income family, which led to an appearance before the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, where she testified about the struggles of middle-class families.

Survivors include her husband David and daughters Michelle and Carolyn.

We will not forget her.

Kevin Yokum

U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd class Kevin Yokum, 27, served in the Pentagon as an intelligence officer.

He joined the Navy out of high school and was stationed in San Diego, Ca. He traveled the world but enjoyed returning to his home in Lake Charles, La., where he was well-liked and remembered for his love of sports. He had been stationed at the Pentagon for three years. “Kevin was a young man who was strong of character, honest, and one who always wanted to encourage and help other people," said his father.

Survivors include his parents Allen and Beulah.

We will not forget him.

Donald McArthur Young

Donald McArthur Young, 41, worked in the Pentagon as chief of naval operations information systems technician.

He attended North Carolina A&T State University and was a veteran of the Persian Gulf war. His medals and awards include Atlantic Fleet Sailor of the Year, Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist, Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (3), National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, Navy Unit Commendation, Good Conduct Medal (2), Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation (2) and Meritorious Unit Commendation.

He was a quiet but compassionate man who would do anything for his fellow man, his teammates and his family.

Survivors include his wife Felicia and sisters Addrene Y. Cheshier, Loretta Young, Alice Y. Macklin, Valerie Y. Kirby and Deborah Y. Key, and brother Edward.

We will not forget him.

Edmond Grafton Young, Jr.

Edmond Grafton Young, Jr., known to his friends as E.G., 22, worked in the Pentagon as a desktop support technician for BTG Inc.

He earned an associate degree in computer applications and network administration at the Computer Learning Center and was working toward a Microsoft certification. He enjoyed mentoring teens, playing basketball and spending time with his friends. He was a devoted and generous father.

Survivors include his son Stephan, parents Margaret and Edmond Young, Sr., and sisters Marvene and Markia.

We will not forget him.

Lisa Young

Lisa Young, 37, worked in the Pentagon as a personnel assistant.

She studied at Georgetown University and began working at the U.S. Department of Defense, DCSPER/Army, in 1986. She enjoyed the precision, sense of purpose and excitement of working for the Army. She was also a devoted mother, loving sister and best friend. But her main priority was her daughter.

Survivors include her daughter, Chaquita.

We will not forget her.

Yuguang Zheng and Shuyin Yang

Yuguang Zheng, 65, and his wife, Shuyin Yang, 62, were passengers on board American Airlines flight 77.

They were returning to China after visiting their daughter in the U.S. for almost a year. Mr. Zheng was a retired chemist who graduated from Nanjing University. His wife was a retired pediatrician who graduated from Shanghai Second Medical University. They were married for 35 years. A reserved man, he loved painting and was accomplished at taichi, while she was an active, open-minded and kind lady who was good at cooking. Family was the most important thing to both of them. They loved each other and their children.

Survivors include their son Shidong and daughter Rui.

We will not forget them.

Names

A
  • Samantha Lightbourn Allen
  • Paul Wesley Ambrose
  • Craig Scott Amundson
B
  • Melissa Rose Barnes
  • Max Beilke
  • Dr. Yeneneh Betru
  • Kris Romeo Bishundat
  • Carrie Blagburn
  • Canfield D. Boone
  • Donna Marie Bowen
  • Allen P. Boyle
  • Bernard Brown
  • Christopher Lee Burford
  • Charles Frank Burlingame III
C
  • Daniel Martin Caballero
  • Jose O. Calderon-Olmedo
  • Suzanne Marie Calley
  • Angelene Carter
  • Sharon Ann Carver
  • William E. Caswell
  • John J. Chada
  • Rosa Maria Chapa
  • David Michael Charlebois
  • Sarah M. Clark
  • Julian Theodore Cooper
  • Asia Cottom
D
  • Ada Marie Davis
  • James Daniel Debeuneure
  • Gerald F. DeConto
  • Rodney Dickens
  • Jerry D. Dickerson
  • Eddie Dillard
  • Johnnie Doctor, Jr.
  • Bob Dolan
  • William H. Donovan
  • Charles A. Droz
  • Patrick Dunn
E
  • Edward Thomas Earhart
  • Barbara Edwards
  • Robert Elseth
F
  • Jamie Lynn Fallon
  • The Falkenberg-Whittington Family
  • James Joe Ferguson
  • Amelia Fields
  • Gerald P. Fisher
  • Darlene Ellen Embree Flagg
  • Wilson Falor Flagg
  • Matthew Michael Flocco
  • Sandra Nadine Foster
G
  • Richard Gabriel
  • Lawrence Daniel Getzfred
  • Cortez Ghee
  • Brenda Colbert Gibson
  • Ronald F. Golinski
  • Ian J. Gray
H
  • Diane Hale-McKinzy
  • Stan Hall
  • Carolyn Halmon
  • Michele Heidenberger
  • Sheila Hein
  • Ronald Hemenway
  • Wallace Cole Hogan, Jr.
  • Jimmy Ira Holley
  • Angela Houtz
  • Brady Kay Howell
  • Peggie Hurt
  • Stephen Neil Hyland, Jr.
  • Robert Joseph Hymel
I
  • Lacey B. Ivory
J
  • Bryan Creed Jack
  • Steven D. Jacoby
  • Dennis Johnson
  • Judith L. Jones
  • Ann Campana Judge
K
  • Brenda Kegler
  • Chandler "Chad" Keller
  • Yvonne Estelle O'Prey Kennedy
  • Norma Khan
  • Karen A. Kincaid
L
  • Michael Lamana
  • David Laychak
  • D.C. Lee
  • Kenneth and Jennifer Lewis
  • Stephen V. Long
  • James T. Lynch, Jr.
  • Terence Michael Lynch
  • Nehamon Lyons IV
M
  • Shelley Ann (Farr) Marshall
  • Teresa Marie Martin
  • Ada Wilson Mason
  • Dean Mattson
  • Timothy J. Maude
  • Robert Maxwell
  • Renee A. May
  • Molly L. McKenzie
  • Dora Menchaca
  • Patricia Mickley
  • Ronald Dutrell Milam
  • Gerard P. Moran
  • Odessa V. Morris
  • Brian Anthony Moss
  • Teddington "Ted" Hamm Moy
  • Patrick J. Murphy
N
  • Khang Nguyen
  • Michael Allen Noeth
O
  • Barbara K. Olson
  • Ruben S. Ornedo
P
  • Diana B. Padro
  • Chin Sun Pak
  • Jonas Martin Panik
  • Clifford L. Patterson, Jr.
  • Robert Penniger
  • Robert R. Ploger III
  • Zandra Cooper Ploger
  • Darin Howard Pontell
  • Scott Powell
  • Jack D. Punches
  • Joseph John Pycior, Jr.
R
  • Lisa J. Raines
  • Deborah Ann Ramsaur
  • Rhonda Sue Ridge Rasmussen
  • Marsha D. Ratchford
  • Martha Reszke
  • Todd Hayes Reuben
  • Cecelia E. Richard
  • Edward Veld Rowenhorst
  • Judy Rowlett
  • Robert E. Russell
  • William Ruth
S
  • Charles (Chuck) Edward Sabin
  • Marjorie Champion Salamone
  • John P. Sammartino
  • David M. Scales
  • Robert Allan Schlegel
  • Janice Marie Scott
  • Michael L. Selves
  • Marian Serva
  • Daniel F. Shanower
  • Antionette Sherman
  • Diane M. Simmons
  • George W. Simmons
  • Don Simmons
  • Cheryle D. Sincock
  • Gregg H. Smallwood
  • Gary F. Smith
  • Mari-Rae Sopper
  • Patricia Statz
  • Edna Lee Stephens
  • Norma Lang Steuerle
  • Larry Lee Strickland
T
  • Hilda E. Taylor
  • Kip P. Taylor
  • Leonard E. Taylor
  • Sandra Carol Taylor
  • Sandra D. Teague
  • Karl William Teepe
  • Tamara Thurman
  • Otis V. Tolbert
  • Willie Q. Troy
V
  • Ronald James Vauk
W
  • Karen J. Wagner
  • Meta Waller
  • Maudlyn White
  • Sandra Letitia White
  • Ernest M. Willcher
  • Dave Williams
  • Dwayne Williams
  • Marvin Roger Woods
Y
  • John D. Yamnicky
  • Vicki Yancey
  • Kevin Yokum
  • Donald McArthur Young
  • Edmond Grafton Young, Jr.
  • Lisa Young
Z
  • Yuguang Zheng and Shuyin Yang