United States Department of Defense United States Department of Defense

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE: Suicide Prevention and Awareness
Updated August 29, 2013

Suicide Prevention and Awareness

Take a Stand

Stand by Them

Emotional strain can be the most formidable opponent service members face in their efforts to keep America safe. This special report takes a closer look at the struggles they cope with and offers information to help troops when they need the nation's support the most.

Top Stories

In Aftermath of Keating: MOH Nominee Carter Gets Help for PTSD

The battle for Combat Outpost Keating was over. The men of Bravo "Black Knight" Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, had triumphed over a Taliban force seven to eight times their size, fighting back from the low ground and inflicting massive casualties, even as the enemy breached their wire. Story

War Hero Credits Counseling for Continued Improvement

On Oct. 3, 2009, 54 soldiers from Troop B, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, defended Combat Outpost Keating, near the town of Kamdesh in eastern Afghanistan's Nuristan province, from an estimated 400 enemy fighters who breached and nearly overran the position. Story

National Plan Supports Veterans' Mental Health, Brain Injury Care

Experts from the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs gathered here yesterday to discuss the future of veterans' mental health and traumatic brain injury research efforts at the Military Health System Research Symposium. Story

Obama: Nation Pours Resources Into Mental Health Care for Vets

The Veterans Affairs Department is improving access for veterans to mental health services, President Barack Obama said today in remarks that opened the National Conference on Mental Health. Story

TV Announcements Illustrate Signs of Suicide Risk

Officials at the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments have produced three public service announcements to help families and friends recognize the signs of potential suicide in veterans and service members. Story

Officials Uphold Commitment to Suicide Prevention Solutions

Invisible wounds such as depression and post-traumatic stress take a significant toll on service members, a panel of Defense Department and service officials told Congress while emphasizing their efforts to address military suicides will persist. Story

Army Post Sets Example in Curbing Suicides, Preventable Deaths

As military leaders struggle to reverse rising suicide rates within the force, Fort Bliss, Texas, is bucking the national trend, reporting a 30-percent drop last year and serving as a promising model for the Army and its sister services. Story

Army Surgeon Shares PTSD Struggles to
Help Others

As the Army conducts a worldwide standdown to draw attention to preventing suicide, among those taking notice is Dr. Tara Dixon, an Army Reserve surgeon who tried to take her own life. Story

Family Matters Blog: Families Can Support Suicide Standdown

As the Army conducts its worldwide standdown for suicide prevention, there is something family members militarywide can do, too, and it only takes a minute. Story

Dempsey: Leadership, Trust Essential to Battling Suicide

Military leaders have changed the way they approach suicide prevention, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said during a recent interview with American Forces Press Service. Story

Guard Enlisted Leader
Stresses Support Available

National Guardsmen should know that they are never alone, even when they are away from their units, the National Guard Bureau's senior enlisted leader said in a Sept. 21 interview. Story

More Stories

Military Crisis Line

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

"Leaders throughout the department must make it understood that seeking help is a sign of strength, not a sign of weakness, it is a sign of strength and courage. We've got to do all we can to remove the stigma that still too often surrounds mental health care issues."

- Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta

"I believe each person has their own threshold of when they may need help or assistance. The moment that indicator lights up within yourself that (you) need some help and assistance or things are not right, … it is time to reach out."

- Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia

Video

More Videos