Korean War Veterans Memorial

Department of Defense Photo Essay

  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The nation is commemorating the 60th anniversary of the start of the Korean War on June 25, 1950. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The United States fought its first battle with the North Korean People's Army on July 5, 1950. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The Korean War started on June 25, 1950, when North Korean forces crossed the 38th Parallel and invaded South Korea.  DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The North Koreans launched a massive, coordinated air-land invasion in the early-morning hours of June 25, 1950, with more than 230,000 troops, fighter jets, attack bombers, reconnaissance aircraft, tanks and artillery. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. President Harry S. Truman ordered U.S. air and naval forces to defend South Korea, and committed ground troops as part of a combined United Nations effort. 

 DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. Seoul, the South Korean capital, fell June 28. President Harry S. Truman, concerned after World War II about the spread of communism, recognized the importance of repelling military aggression on the Korean peninsula. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The 16-member coalition formed under the auspices of the U.S.-led United Nations Command, with President Harry S. Truman naming Army Gen. Douglas MacArthur as its commander.
 DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The 24th Infantry Division, part of the U.S. occupation forces in Japan under Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s command following World War II, deployed the first U.S. troops to Korea. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. As they awaited follow-on deployments, the 24th Infantry Division troops, known as Task Force Smith, suffered heavy losses and ultimately, defeat during their first significant engagement of the war, the Battle of Osan.

 DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. Outgunned and overpowered, the 24th Infantry Division ultimately lost more than 3,600 dead and wounded and almost 3,000 captured as the North Korean progressed south. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010. The Battle of Pusan Perimeter raged from August to September 1950, with the U.S. Air Force and Navy air forces attacking North Korean logistics operations and transportation hubs. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010.  The Inchon Landing, a massive amphibious landing in September 1950, ultimately turned the tide in the fighting by breaking the North Korean army’s supply lines.  DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi
  • Tourists visit the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., June 30, 2010.  Two years of negotiations led to an armistice agreement signed July 27, 1953. The United States lost more than 36,000 servicemembers during the Korean War, with more than 92,000 wounded, more than 8,000 missing in action and more than 7,000 taken as prisoners of war. DoD photo by Souheil Mechlawi