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IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release No: 195-98
April 27, 1998

SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY AWARD WINNERS NAMED TODAY AT 36TH ANNUAL CEREMONY

In a Pentagon ceremony today Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen congratulated the sixteen winners of the Defense Environmental Security Awards for their outstanding accomplishments in natural resources conservation, cultural resources management, environmental quality, pollution prevention, recycling, and environmental cleanup. Awards were given to installation personnel who excel and innovate in environmental protection in ways that support the defense mission, and provide savings to the Department of Defense.

Awards recipients are listed below by Service and category.

Department of the Army

Natural Resources Conservation--Large Installation

FORT STEWART/HUNTER ARMY AIRFIELD, GA.

The installation exemplified integration between readiness and environmental stewardship by its innovative natural areas management strategies on 280,000 acres.

Cultural Resources ManagementInstallation

FORT HOOD, TEXAS

Fort Hood's comprehensive cultural resources management program included a systematic inventory of cultural resources on all training areas, with a total listing of four National Register-eligible historic structures; 1,093 prehistoric archeological sites; 1,121 historic archeological sites; and one Native American sacred site.

Cultural Resources Management--Individual

ALAN J. WORMSER, TEXAS ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

As the Director of Cultural Resources for the Texas Army National Guard, Mr. Wormser designed and implemented the only in-house cultural resources program in the National Guard. This program saved $500,000 in consultation fees, while protecting cultural resources.

Environmental Quality--Non-Industrial Installation FORT SILL, OKLA.

Among its numerous successes, Fort Sill has remediated over 40,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil on the installation using a state-of- the-art microbial process, and developed a unique storm water filtration system which has saved $192,000 per year in hazardous waste disposal costs.

Environmental Quality--Individual

MAJ. DONALD F. ARCHIBALD, USA, 133RD PREVENTIVE MEDICINE DETACHMENT, HEIDELBERG, GERMANY.

Archibald established, managed, and oversaw all environmental programs for Operation Joint Endeavor in the U.S. sector in Bosnia, Croatia and Hungary. His highly effective hazardous waste management program expedited the removal of over 625,000 liters of used fuel and oil and 1.8 million kilograms of hazardous waste.

Pollution Prevention--Non-Industrial Installation

FORT CARSON AND PINON CANYON MANEUVER SITE, COLO.

Fort Carson's aggressive Environmental Compliance Assistance Program focused on pollution prevention and, combined with a strong training effort, led to a $3 million cost avoidance in 1996 and a 55 percent reduction in abandoned hazardous materials from 1994 through 1996. Fort Carson reduced its hazardous waste disposal costs by more than $200,000 since 1993 and earned more than $250,000 in 1996 by recycling 3.6 million pounds of materials.

Recycling--Individual

JAYCEE W. TURNQUIST, FORT HOOD, TEXAS.

Turnquist increased annual recycling production from 2,487 tons in 1995 to more than 4,000 tons in 1997. The recycling program also generated more than $2.2 million in sales, avoided $149,000 in disposal costs, and nearly tripled the amount of material diverted from the landfill.

Environmental Cleanup

RIVERBANK ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT, CALIF.

Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant (AAP) developed and implemented an environmental cleanup program that is nearly 20 years ahead of schedule and has scored a number of firsts for Federal facilities on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL). Riverbank AAP has repeatedly set the standards for Federal NPL facilities by becoming the first to complete a final record of decision with the EPA, the first to receive an installation-wide construction complete status from the EPA, and the first Federal facility to apply for installation-wide deletion from the NPL.

Department of the Navy

Natural Resources Conservation--Small Installation

NAVAL SUBMARINE BASE KINGS BAY, GA.

Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. implemented and maintained a successful program that encompassed forest, ecosystem, and land-use management of natural resources, particularly those portions of the Cumberland Island National Seashore maintained within base boundaries. Major accomplishments include transferring more than $100,000 from timber harvest to Camden County, creating a 16-acre saltmarsh mitigation area, and protecting endangered birds and animals, such as the Least Tern and the Manatee.

Environmental Quality--Industrial Installation

NAVAL AVIATION DEPOT NORTH ISLAND, SAN DIEGO, CALIF.

For the fourth year in a row, NADEP has received no violations from San Diego Air Pollution Control inspections. Their expertise in the area of air quality allowed the installation to achieve a 90 percent reduction in ozone depleting substances (ODS) usage-using 1990 as the baseline year. NADEP has also installed control equipment to reduce by 99 percent emissions of lead, cadmium, and arsenic from foundry operations.

Pollution Prevention--Weapon System Acquisition Team

NEW ATTACK SUBMARINE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TEAM, ARLINGTON, VA.

The New Attack Submarine (PMS 450) Program reduced the number of adhesives used on the New Attack Submarine by approximately 61 percent, the number of paints and coatings by approximately 31 percent, and the number of solvents and cleaning products by approximately 80 percent during the design phase of the program.

Recycling--Non- Industrial Installation

NAVAL STATION SAN DIEGO, CALIF.

The Naval Station (NAVSTA) San Diego recycling program diverts over 15,000 tons per year of material that would otherwise fill landfills. On a weekly basis, it recycles 44 tons of solid waste, 154 tons of construction and demolition debris, and 101 tons of scrap metal.

Department of the Air Force

Natural Resources ConservationIndividual

PHILIP D. PRUITT, HURLBURT FIELD, FLA.

Pruitt's integrated natural resources management plan resulted in removal of aggressive exotic species from over 4,000 acres of Air Force property, and organized the construction of the Grace Brown Nature Trail utilizing volunteer labor to minimize costs. He partnered with regulators to develop the first wetland inventory using Global Positioning System technology in the State of Florida.

Pollution Prevention--Industrial Installation

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, GA.

Robins Air Force Base has reduced use of ozone depleting chemicals by 99 percent and use of EPA-17 chemicals by 89 percent from their FY 1992 baseline. They virtually eliminated methylene chloride use in paint stripping operations, resulting in annual savings of $790,000 for C-141 aircraft alone.

Recycling--Industrial Installation

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, GA.

Robins Air Force Base is currently recycling over 74,000 pounds of solvent per year, resulting in acquisition savings and disposal cost avoidance of $204,000 annually. Their aggressive office and work area recycling program is recycling over 8,000 tons of materials annually, and they are ultimately recycling 47 percent of the waste stream.

Defense Logistics Agency

Special Award

PALOS VERDES BLUE BUTTERFLY CONSERVATION TEAM DEFENSE FUEL SUPPORT POINT, SAN PEDRO, CALIF.

The Defense Fuel Support Point (DFSP), San Pedro, Calif., developed partnerships with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, academia, the Audubon Society, the Disney Corp., and local volunteers to enhance the DFSP native habitat. This habitat is home to California coastal sage, a plant that is critical to the survival of the endangered Palos Verdes Blue Butterfly and the threatened California gnatcatcher.

Further information on environmental programs is available at http: www.acq.osd.mil/ens