U.S. Department of Defense Header Image (click to return to U.S. Department of Defense homepage)
Search DefenseLink.mil
Updated: 27 Aug 2004
2004 Summer Olympics
"I'm still wearing my flag on my uniform that says USA, so that was enough to make me put everything I had into it."

- 1st Lt. Chad Senior (Modern Pentathlon)

2004 Olympics
Armed Forces Participants


Army Sgt. Oscar Wood, 29, of Fort Carson, Colo., competed in the 66-kilogram class of the Greco-Roman event. He attended Oregon State, where he majored in behavioral science. Wood was the 2004 Olympic trials champion and came in 2nd at the 2004 U.S. nationals.


Photo by Tim Hipps, USACFSC Public Affairs

 

 

 

Abdullah: Army Staff Sgt. Basheer Abdullah, 41, of St. Louis, will travel to Athens as the head coach for the 2004 Olympic boxing team. He served as adviser for the U.S. boxing team in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney and was named 2002 Coach of the Year. Abdullah became the Army's head coach in 1996, three years after he retired from the ring.

(Courtesy photo)

 




Air Force 1st Lt. James Parker, 28, of Great Falls, Mont., will compete in the hammer throw. He majored in exercise science at Utah State, were he was a state discus champion and two-time state shot put champ. Parker placed 1st in the 2004 Olympic trials and was the 2003 USA Outdoor champion.

(Courtesy photo)

ATHENS, Greece, Aug. 27, 2004 – Army Capt. Anita Allen defied all odds by finishing 18th in women's modern pentathlon today in the 2004 Summer Olympic Games at Goudi Olympic Complex.

She accomplished the feat despite undergoing left ankle surgery last November without having needed time to properly rehabilitate. She also missed nearly a year of healthy training for the Olympics before and after the operation.

The highlight of her five-sport performance here was a flawless, first-place ride aboard Dino in the equestrian show-jumping event. "My ride, gosh, I couldn't have asked for anything better," said Allen, 26, of Star City, Ind. "I did something well today, and just for a moment it felt really good."

Full Story By Tim Hipps Special to American Forces Press Service


ATHENS, Greece, Aug. 27, 2004 – The day after his competition went awry, Army 1st Lt. Chad Senior said he had no regrets about his 13th-place performance Aug. 26 in the Olympic men's modern pentathlon.

"I wish it would've worked out differently," said Senior, 29. "It's hard for an athlete to say you did your best because usually you can always pick apart where you didn't. I can honestly say effort-wise, I left absolutely nothing on the table, and I don't know how many times in my life I could actually say that – very few times."

In the 2000 Sydney Games, Senior was distraught during the cross-country run after dropping from first to eighth place in the subsequent equestrian event. On that day, he admittedly didn't give his all on the run.

Full Story By Tim Hipps Special to American Forces Press Service


ATHENS, Greece, Aug. 26, 2004 – Army 1st Lt. Chad Senior saved his best for last, but it wasn't enough as he finished 13th in men's modern pentathlon today in the 2004 Summer Olympic Games at Goudi Olympic Complex here.

Senior, 29, finished second in the 3,000-meter cross-country run with a time of 9 minutes, 35.76 seconds. It was the last of five events that included pistol shooting, fencing, swimming and equestrian riding.

Russia's Andrey Moiseev won the gold medal. Lithuania's Andrejus Zadneprovskis took the silver medal. Czech Republic's Libor Capalini claimed the bronze.


Full Story By Tim Hipps Special to American Forces Press Service


Related Videos
Surviving Class
src="http://images.radcity.net/5765/753536.WMV" width="213" height="179" align="middle" type="application/x-mplayer2" pluginspage = "http://www.microsoft.com/Windows/MediaPlayer/"> S

 Site Map   Privacy & Security Notice   About DoD   External Link Disclaimer   Web Policy   About DefenseLINK   FirstGov.gov