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Researchers and Scientists Review Projects
Air Force Office of Scientific Research officials recently traveled to Atlanta where they
completed their yearly Joint Program Review of basic research funded projects.
By William J. Sharp / Air Force Office of Scientific Research Public Affairs

ARLINGTON, Va., Aug. 25, 2006 – Air Force Office of Scientific Research officials recently traveled to Atlanta where they completed their yearly Joint Program Review of basic research funded projects.

Hundreds of notable researchers and scientists from throughout the United States attended this year’s program representing universities, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the federal and private sectors.   

According to Dr. John D. Schmisseur, an Air Force Office of Scientific Research program manager and conference co-host, the Joint Program Review benefits the Air Force by providing an opportunity for cross-disciplinary communication and collaboration among members of Air Force Materiel Command’s Air Force Research Laboratory.

“During the review, Air Force Research Laboratory personnel receive updates on progress, accomplishments, and breakthroughs concerning funded research,” Schmisseur said.

Air Force program managers also use the Joint Program Review to assess the overall strength of their basic research portfolios.

In addition, the review nurtures opportunities for scientific peer reviews in an open forum and encourages collaborative solution development among the researchers – an important layer of scientific discovery and innovation. 

Major topic areas covered during the review included physical mathematics and applied analysis, plasma aerodynamics and magneto hydrodynamics, boundary layer physics, numerical methods, flow control, turbo machinery flows, cooperative control, shear layer flows, and control for space systems.

Many of the Joint Program Review research projects in progress continue to show great potential for future Air Force application.

For example, a research team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed a new approach to the task assignment process of unmanned aerial vehicles operating in uncertain dynamic environments.

The approach has to do with such factors as target cost, time variance, and target-to-UAV distances. 

In another funded project, a team at the University of Iowa has been developing numerical methods and a computer code focused on high-speed munitions impact.

This research could have important applications in the areas of target penetration, hazard prevention, and collateral damage control.

Program managers who led the review on behalf of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Aerospace and Materials Sciences Directorate are Schmisseur, boundary layers and hypersonics portfolio, and Lt. Col. Rhett W. Jefferies, turbulence and rotating flows portfolio.

This directorate researches activities in aerospace, engineering, and materials.  At present, its program managers oversee more than 350 basic research projects.

The four major projects in the directorate are solid mechanics and structures, structural materials, fluid dynamics, and propulsion.

Program managers who led the review from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Mathematics and Information Sciences Directorate are Fariba Fahroo, computational mathematics portfolio; Arje Nachman, physical mathematics and applied analysis portfolio; and Lt. Col. Sharon A. Heise, dynamics and control portfolio.

Program managers in this directorate manage an estimated 300 basic research projects with focus on mathematical, information, and computer sciences. Many critical research activities are multidisciplinary and involve support from the other scientific directorates within Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Such activities include joint research in the design of high-power microwave devices, and in human-machine interaction and information fusion. 

By supporting events such as the Joint Program Review, Air Force Office of Scientific Research continues to expand the horizon of scientific knowledge through its leadership and management of the Air Force’s basic research program.

As a vital component of the Air Force Research Laboratory, Air Force Office of Scientific Research supports Air Force’s mission of control and maximum utilization of air and space.

Many of the technological breakthroughs enjoyed by millions today, such as lasers, GPS, and the computer mouse trace their scientific roots to research first funded by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.
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Apr. 17, 2014
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