Funding Process for DoD Now Strategy Driven, in Healthy Place, Mattis Says


The funding process for the U.S. military is back in a healthy place, Defense Secretary James N. Mattis said yesterday in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis talks to members of the military.
Defense Secretary James N. Mattis participated in the U.S. Northern Command/North American Aerospace Defense Command change-of-command ceremony at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., May 24, 2018. Air Force Gen. Lori J. Robinson relinquished Northcom/NORAD command to Air Force Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy. Mattis is pictured here speaking with Robinson, left, and other defense leaders at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., Nov. 16, 2017. DoD photo by Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis talks to members of the military.
Secretary Visit
Defense Secretary James N. Mattis participated in the U.S. Northern Command/North American Aerospace Defense Command change-of-command ceremony at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., May 24, 2018. Air Force Gen. Lori J. Robinson relinquished Northcom/NORAD command to Air Force Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy. Mattis is pictured here speaking with Robinson, left, and other defense leaders at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., Nov. 16, 2017. DoD photo by Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith

The secretary spoke at the U.S. Air Force Academy graduation, and today he participated in the U.S. Northern Command/North American Aerospace Defense Command change-of-command ceremony at Peterson Air Force Base, also in Colorado Springs.

Mattis emphasized the ties between the National Defense Strategy and the budget process, and said the budget submission was underpinned by strategy for the first time in 10 years.

DoD Funding Process

He has urged congressional leaders to provide predictable funding for the department since taking office, and urged Congress to become more involved in its constitutional duty to fund the department. In nine of the last 10 years, the department spent at least some of the time under a continuing resolution.

“What that meant was, if there were evolving threat or a thing we needed to adapt to, number one, we didn't have a strategic framework within which you'd go, for example, to the Congress and say here's why we want additional money here,” the secretary said.

And the department couldn’t get additional monies under a continuing resolution. “Without the steady budget, we could not do new starts,” Mattis said. “So things from the Army's modernization program, to cyber efforts, to outer space efforts were either stillborn or just put in a dormant status.”

This situation caused the American military overmatch to erode over time, and now the department must make up for lost time, the secretary said.

“We are doing that with the bipartisan support of the Congress to pass the two-year authorization bill and … the omnibus bill,” he said.

Mattis is pleased that Congress is no longer in a spectator role with the budget, “but actually saying where they want money put. There will be arguments … and good arguments, about where the priorities should be. And that's up to us to make certain we can bring the analysis that we have of defining problems and what solutions we want to bring forward.”

More Lethal Military

Still, DoD officials must recognize that proposed changes must be tied “to make the military more lethal in outer space and cyberspace, at sea, on land, and in the air,” the secretary said. “And we want to do so as much as possible by strengthening our partners and our allies.”

Finding funding from within is also a major push, and Mattis insists DoD must be a good steward of taxpayer dollars. Congress has given the department new tools to enable the Pentagon to adopt best practices from industry and reform processes inside the department.

“Congress has actually had to step in and reorganize our acquisition, technology and logistics oversight into research and engineering for the future, and then acquisition sustainment,” he said.

Pentagon Reform

After years of stops and starts, he said, the Pentagon may actually be able to deliver on sustainable reforms. “I cannot right now, look you in the eye and say that we can tell you that every penny in the past has been spent in a strategically sound and auditable manner,” he said. “And so this year, for the first time in 70 years, the Pentagon will perform an audit.

“We'll have an audit done of itself and I look forward to every problem we find, because we're going to fix every one of them,” he continued. “So, I can look you people in the eye and say I'm getting your money and here's what I'm doing with it.”

New technologies and new uses for older technologies are being studied with research into artificial intelligence, hypersonics, outer space activities, and research in the cyber realm, the secretary said.

“These have all got to be looked at, because as we say in the U.S. Department of Defense, our adversaries get a vote and you have to deal with that if we're going to keep this this experiment of America alive,” he said.

(Follow Jim Garamone on Twitter: @GaramoneDoDNews)