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Airmen Deliver De-ice Advice

U.S. airmen provided an assist to counterparts in Lithuania recently after that nation's air force acquired a new de-icing vehicle.

Airmen assigned to the 435th Contingency Response Support Squadron and 171st Air Refueling Wing spent five days giving classroom instruction and hands-on training to Lithuanian personnel on the Global ER-2875 de-icer, which is designed for removing frozen precipitation from large aircraft. 

An airman stands and points at text on a large screen in front of a class of fellow troops.
Classroom Instruction
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Erik Silva, 435th Contingency Response Support Squadron aircraft maintenance air advisor, teaches Lithuanian air force personnel assigned to the Terminal Operations Squadron de-icing procedures for C-17 Globemaster III aircraft at Šiauliai Air Base, Lithuania, Jan. 16, 2023.
Photo By: Air Force Airman 1st Class Edgar Grimaldo
VIRIN: 230116-F-VY348-0058R
An airman sits in a bucket raised by a mechanical arm above a flight line.
In the Bucket
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Trey Drogus, 171st Air Refueling Wing crew chief, controls a Global ER-2875 de-icer nozzle during training with the Lithuanian air force at Šiauliai Air Base, Lithuania, Jan. 17, 2023. Drogus demonstrated the proper way to operate the nozzle to Lithuanian air force personnel.
Photo By: Air Force Airman 1st Class Edgar Grimaldo
VIRIN: 230117-F-VY348-0225R

The training and instruction covered vehicle safety, emergency procedures, technical specifications and maintenance, culminating with a road test. 

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"Without the in-depth training we provided, operating a truck that has the capability of reaching max heights of 78 feet can become unsafe very quickly," said Air Force Tech. Sgt. Erik Silva, a 435th Contingency Response Support Squadron aircraft maintenance air advisor.

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(Adapted from an article by Air Force Airman 1st Class Edgar Grimaldo, 86th Airlift Wing Public Affairs)

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