Partnerships

Hollywood Meets the Pentagon

Oct. 16, 2018 | BY Jim Garamone

Hollywood came to the Pentagon as actor Gerard Butler spoke to Pentagon reporters about his collaboration with the Navy in making “Hunter Killer,” a submarine movie due out this week.

The Pentagon press briefing studio was filled to capacity as Butler — who plays the commander of the fictional attack sub USS Arkansas in the movie — answered questions about the experience.

Actor Gerard Butler fields questions from reporters at the Pentagon.
Taking Questions
Actor Gerard Butler fields questions from reporters at the Pentagon on his upcoming movie, “Hunter Killer,” Oct 15, 2018.
Photo By: DOD photo
VIRIN: 181015-D-ZZ999-893Y

DOD officials approved the request in December 2014, and the Navy provided access and technical support to the filmmakers.

The movie’s plot focuses on an operation aimed at averting war with Russia. Butler said it brings the submarine genre into the 21st century. “Hunter Killer” is a chance to take viewers into submarines and let them see the culture, “and really see how these people think, work, their courage, their intelligence, basically their brilliance,” the actor said.

Actor Gerard Butler speaks for a video.
Shout Out
Actor Gerard Butler video tapes a “shout out” at the Pentagon, Oct. 15, 2018, for U.S. service members worldwide.
Photo By: DOD photo
VIRIN: 181015-D-ZZ999-951Y

The plot alternates between the submarine, a special operations team inserted in Russia and the Pentagon.

Navy Vice Adm. Fritz Roegge, now the president of the National Defense University, was the commander of the U.S. Submarine Force in the Pacific during filming.

Only a small fraction of young Americans qualify to serve in the military. An even smaller number are aware of the opportunities the services offer. “Although the Navy benefits from technology that gives us the world’s most capable platforms and equipment, it is our people who are truly our greatest strength,” he said.

”It's more important than ever that we find ways to inspire the next generation of warfighters to consider serving our country in the Navy,” Roegge said.

Movie star Gerard Butler takes a selfie with a woman.
Butler Visit
In this file photo, Gerard Butler visits with fans at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., while promoting his movie "London has Fallen," Feb. 26, 2016.
Photo By: Pfc. Emmanuel Necoechea
VIRIN: 160226-M-EN121-202Y

Officials stressed that support to “Hunter Killer” or any other movie is done at zero cost to the American taxpayer.

Butler was immersed in the submarine culture sailing aboard the USS Houston from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Being aboard the submarine was like being in another world, he said. “I felt like I could spend a year just in sonar. But I was shipped from sonar to the bridge, to navigation to the engine room to the torpedo room because I had a very quick-minded sub commander who wanted to show me every working, living part of the submarine — even how to compress trash.”

Butler added, “What I really took out of it was the brilliance and the humility of the sailors I worked with. Not that I didn’t have that appreciation before – I certainly did – but having spent time with them to realize how their minds work and how agile and how creative they have to be. And they are constantly being tested to prove themselves to think logically, to think intuitively, and in all different matters.”

And it was real for Butler. “You can do it in a movie, but when you are actually on a sub, you realize the dangers that are there,” he said. “You are a thousand feet underwater and you go, ‘OK. What are the different ways things can go wrong?’ You have a greater appreciation of what these people do every day, unsung and unseen, and their courage and valor.”

 



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