Lethality

Forewarned by Intelligence

Jan. 24, 2019 | BY Jim Garamone

The old saying, "forewarned is forearmed" has never been more appropriate.

The National Intelligence Strategy, unveiled by the Director of National Intelligence Daniel R. Coats on Jan. 22, aims to ensure that American leaders are forewarned now and in the future.

A soldier and a civilian sit at a table.
National Intelligence
Army Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley Jr., right, director of Defense Intelligence Agency, and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats discuss the Intelligence Community's 2018 assessment of threats to U.S. national security during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee, March 6, 2018.
Photo By: Brian Murphy, DOD
VIRIN: 180306-D-LU230-0012C

The strategy is aimed at ensuring the various agencies that make up the U.S. intelligence community — which includes eight DOD entities — are working in tandem to provide the best intelligence and information. The strategy also looks for ways to better share information and intelligence inside the U.S. government and with close allies and partners.

The strategy derives from President Donald J. Trump’s National Security Strategy, which names Russia and China as near-peer competitors. North Korea, Iran and violent extremism are also dangers that leaders must guard against, according to the NSS.

From left, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, Vice President Mike Pence and Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley listen to an intelligence brief during the vice president’s visit to DIA headquarters Nov. 6, at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C.
Vice President Pence visits DIA HQ
From left, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, Vice President Mike Pence and Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley listen to an intelligence brief during the vice president’s visit to DIA headquarters Nov. 6, at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, D.C.
Photo By: DIA Public Affairs
VIRIN: 171106-D-AN790-164

But the intelligence community cannot just concentrate on one or two threats in this dangerous world, the NIS said. The community must invest resources in combating emerging threats. The cyber world and space are new domains of warfare that require attention. The relative low cost of operations in the cyber realm and the lack of attribution makes the domain attractive to smaller nations, terror groups, transnational criminal networks and even individuals, the strategy noted.

The NIS emphasizes innovation. It calls on professionals to adapt old methods in new ways, while looking to how to use new technologies to protect America, its allies and partners.

Read more about the strategy here.