Partnerships

Japanese, U.S. Defense Strategies Share Similarities

April 19, 2019 | BY David Vergun

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan hosted Japanese Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya at the Pentagon to discuss the defense relationship between their countries.

01:01
Video by Air Force Staff Sgt. Neal Uranga, DOD

Earlier in the day, the two defense leaders and their nations' top diplomats — Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono and U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo — participated in a "2-plus-2" meeting at the State Department.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan, Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo and two Japanese leaders stand at four different podiums in a row facing a seated crowd.
2 Plus 2
Japanese Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya, left, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo and Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan participate in a joint press availability at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, April 19, 2019.
Photo By: State Department photo by Ron Przysucha
VIRIN: 190419-O-ZZ999-303
Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan, Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo and two Japanese leaders stand in a half circle.
Four Leaders
Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, left, Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan and Japanese Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya have a discussion at the Department of State in Washington, April 19, 2019.
Photo By: State Department photo by Michael Gross
VIRIN: 190419-O-ZZ999-302

The United States and Japan have shared goals in the Indo-Pacific region and are allies.

As an important partner, Japan participates with the United States and other partners in a number of bilateral and multilateral exercises including:

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Keen Sword, a biennial exercise, the most recent being last year. The exercise includes fleets and air wings from both nations.
People gaze at computer screen
Japanese Reports
Navy Lt. j.g. Brandon Vitton gives Japanese reporters a tour of the bridge of the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville, March 30, 2019. The ship is docked in Yokosuka, Japan.
Photo By: Kristina Doss, Navy
VIRIN: 190330-N-RW598-1139C
2
Yama Sakura, an annual exercise that also included the Australian army last year.
Soldier sites gun
Fire Safety
Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Joseph Mauldin fits his M-4 carbine to a port of a Japanese vehicle that allows users to fire their weapon from safety during training for U.S. and Japanese forces at Fort Irwin, Calif., Jan. 29, 2019.
Photo By: Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Andrew R. Bray
VIRIN: 190129-M-MY519-1019C
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The Japan Self Defense Force, as Japan's military is called, also participates in a number of other exercises, such as Balikatan, an annual U.S.-Philippine exercise.
Troops walk carrying stretcher
Simulated Causalities
Marines and sailors assigned to the 1st Marine Logistics Group and Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers with 1st Amphibious Rapid Development Regiment move simulated casualties to an MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft for medical evacuation training during Exercise Iron Fist at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 22, 2019.
Photo By: Marine Corps Cpl. Cutler Brice
VIRIN: 190122-M-SK635-236C
The U.S.-Japan alliance was strengthened in 2015 through the release of the revised U.S.-Japan Defense Guidelines, which provide for new and expanded forms of security-oriented cooperation. Japan provides bases as well as financial and material support to U.S. forward-deployed forces, which are essential for maintaining stability in the region.